Moscow's Mad Scientists Have Figured Out How To Warp Time

Christian Wood
Christian Wood

Moscow's Mad Scientists Have Figured Out How To Warp Time As Putin Seeks To Dominate Space-Time Continuum

Lead researcher Dr Gordey Lesovik, of Moscow’s Laboratory of the Physics of Quantum Information at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, said: “We have artificially created a state that evolves in a direction opposite to that of the thermodynamic arrow of time.”

His team used a rudimentary quantum computer, which carries information on subatomic particles. He hopes their findings, in journal Scientific Reports, will help improve processing power.

So how does it work? Well the time machine is actually a rudimentary quantum computer made up of electron qubits.

A qubit is a the basic unit of quantum information – a unit that represents one, zero, and both one and zero at the same time.

Researchers ran an "evolution program", which caused the qubits to enter a complicated changing pattern of ones and zeroes.

And during this process, the order was lost – like hitting balls at the start of a game of pool.

A separate program then modified the state of this quantum computer so that it evolved backwards, returning from chaos to order.

This allowed the qubits to return to their original starting point.

Scientists were able to perform this so-called "time reversal" successfully 85 per cent of the time with two qubits, and had a 50 per cent success rate with three qubits.

The team were able to then calculate the probability of a "smeared out" electron spontaneously "localising" back to its recent past – travelling through time, in effect.

And it turns out that if you observe 10billion freshly localised electrons every second for 13.7billion years, you'd only see this happen once.

And even then, the electron would only travel no more than a ten-billionth of a second into the past.

That's not ideal, because not being able to predict time-reversal makes the system useless to scientists.

That's why it's so important that scientists were able to successfully "reverse time on demand" with a quantum computer.

No doubt this technology will be seeked by demonic tyrannts around the world to control and end Man's destiny.

thesun.co.uk/tech/8624077/time-machine-experiment-quantum-physics-electrons/
web.archive.org/web/20190314010451/https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/8624077/time-machine-experiment-quantum-physics-electrons/

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Other urls found in this thread:

phys.org/news/2019-03-physicists-reverse-quantum.html#jCp
arxiv.org/pdf/1712.10057.pdf
technologyreview.com/s/610250/serious-quantum-computers-are-finally-here-what-are-we-going-to-do-with-them/

Nathaniel Lopez
Nathaniel Lopez

<the wife's sun
all bullshit

Colton Powell
Colton Powell


No doubt this technology will be seeked by demonic tyrannts Jews. Last thing we need are immortal Rothschilds

fixed it for you user

Brody Young
Brody Young

I stand corrected, good catch. Yes it looks like they are about to find a loophole to defy the very basic Justice of nature: death for all, and change it death for those whom are not (((us))). Times are truly getting more demonic for humanity.

Aiden Bell
Aiden Bell

SUN : the UKs National INQUIRER

congratulations on spelling 'continuum' correctly.
it doesn't seem like somebody who actually reads The Sun would be able to spell a four syllable word, let alone the word continuu……

oh… wait a minute…..
You just copied and pasted it….

Nevermind

Benjamin Cruz
Benjamin Cruz

evolution program
successfully 85 per cent of the time with two qubits, and had a 50 per cent success rate with three qubits.
Hey guys, if I mash billiard balls to a wire mesh, I have 85% two balls will bounce of each other and the wire, and 50% chance if 3 balls. Imagine I send a whole galaxy's worth of balls on to that mesh, we have a really good chance of time travelling, because statistics said so!

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Justin Bennett
Justin Bennett

I am confused.
I shall write a letter to our President to explain this femnominom to me.

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Kayden Sanders
Kayden Sanders

yor Grand Poobah President here

I have read the papers and this is valid.

I have amended the research somewhat to make it easier for the less intellectually gifted to comprehend:

GENERAL TIME REVERSALALGORITHMSConsider a quantum system initially prepared in thestate Ψ(t= 0) and let it evolve during the timeτintothe state Ψ(τ) =e−iˆHτ/~Ψ(0). Let us find a minimalsize of a qubit register needed to simulate the dynamicsof a system Ψ(0)→Ψ(τ) with a given fidelity 1−. Letus choose a finite set of time instancesti∈[0,τ],i=0,…N′subject to a condition|〈Ψ(ti)|Ψ(ti+1〉)|2= 1−witht0= 0 for some small >0. Then at any timeinstantt∈[0,τ] a state Ψ(t) can be approximated bythe discrete set of states{Ψ(ti),i= 0,…,N′}with thefidelity 1−. The set of states{Ψ(ti)}spans the HilbertsubspaceSof the dimensionN ≤ N′. Therefore,Nbasis vectors|ei〉∈Scan be represented byNorthogonalstates of the qubit register,|ei〉 → |~bi〉 ≡ |b0b1…〉. Thecorresponding qubit HamiltonianˆHwhich mimics theoriginal HamiltonianˆHis then defined by the relation(ˆH)ij≡〈~bi|ˆH|~bj〉=〈ei|ˆH|ej〉.Below we introduce two encoding procedures|ei〉 →|~bi〉. In the first,sparsecoding approach, one assignsa separate qubit to each state|ei〉,i∈[0,N −1] andencodes the stateψ(τ) into theN-qubit state|ψ〉=∑N−1i=0ψi|00…1i…0N−1〉. The second approach is adensecoding scheme where one records the stateψ(τ)into a state ofn= int[log2(N)] + 1 qubits|ψ〉=∑N−1i=0ψi|i〉, where|i〉≡|b0…bn−1〉is a computationalbasis state corresponding a binary representation of thenumberi=∑n−1k=0bk2n−1−k.A time-reversal operation

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Levi Ramirez
Levi Ramirez

"This is one in a series of papers on the possibility of violating the second law of thermodynamics. That law is closely related to the notion of the arrow of time that posits the one-way direction of time from the past to the future," said the study's lead author Gordey Lesovik, who heads the Laboratory of the Physics of Quantum Information Technology at MIPT.

"We began by describing a so-called local perpetual motion machine of the second kind. Then, in December, we published a paper that discusses the violation of the second law via a device called a Maxwell's demon," Lesovik said. "The most recent paper approaches the same problem from a third angle: We have artificially created a state that evolves in a direction opposite to that of the thermodynamic arrow of time."

What makes the future different from the past

Most laws of physics make no distinction between the future and the past. For example, let an equation describe the collision and rebound of two identical billiard balls. If a close-up of that event is recorded with a camera and played in reverse, it can still be represented by the same equation. Moreover, it is not possible to distinguish from the recording if it has been doctored. Both versions look plausible. It would appear that the billiard balls defy the intuitive sense of time.

However, imagine recording a cue ball breaking the pyramid, the billiard balls scattering in all directions. In that case, it is easy to distinguish the real-life scenario from reverse playback. What makes the latter look so absurd is our intuitive understanding of the second law of thermodynamics—an isolated system either remains static or evolves toward a state of chaos rather than order.

Most other laws of physics do not prevent rolling billiard balls from assembling into a pyramid, infused tea from flowing back into the tea bag, or a volcano from "erupting" in reverse. But these phenomena are not observed, because they would require an isolated system to assume a more ordered state without any outside intervention, which runs contrary to the second law. The nature of that law has not been explained in full detail, but researchers have made great headway in understanding the basic principles behind it.

Spontaneous time reversal

Quantum physicists from MIPT decided to check if time could spontaneously reverse itself at least for an individual particle and for a tiny fraction of a second. That is, instead of colliding billiard balls, they examined a solitary electron in empty interstellar space.

"Suppose the electron is localized when we begin observing it. This means that we're pretty sure about its position in space. The laws of quantum mechanics prevent us from knowing it with absolute precision, but we can outline a small region where the electron is localized," says study co-author Andrey Lebedev from MIPT and ETH Zurich.

The physicist explains that the evolution of the electron state is governed by Schrödinger's equation. Although it makes no distinction between the future and the past, the region of space containing the electron will spread out very quickly. That is, the system tends to become more chaotic. The uncertainty of the electron's position is growing. This is analogous to the increasing disorder in a large-scale system—such as a billiard table—due to the second law of thermodynamics.

Read more at: phys.org/news/2019-03-physicists-reverse-quantum.html#jCp
Read more at: phys.org/news/2019-03-physicists-reverse-quantum.html#jCp

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Charles Gonzalez
Charles Gonzalez

huh:

<->
"However, Schrödinger's equation is reversible," adds Valerii Vinokur, a co-author of the paper, from the Argonne National Laboratory, U.S. "Mathematically, it means that under a certain transformation called complex conjugation, the equation will describe a 'smeared' electron localizing back into a small region of space over the same time period." Although this phenomenon is not observed in nature, it could theoretically happen due to a random fluctuation in the cosmic microwave background permeating the universe.

The team set out to calculate the probability to observe an electron "smeared out" over a fraction of a second spontaneously localizing into its recent past. It turned out that even across the entire lifetime of the universe—13.7 billion years—observing 10 billion freshly localized electrons every second, the reverse evolution of the particle's state would only happen once. And even then, the electron would travel no more than a mere one ten-billionth of a second into the past.

Large-scale phenomena involving billiard balls and volcanoes obviously unfold on much greater timescales and feature an astounding number of electrons and other particles. This explains why we do not observe old people growing younger or an ink blot separating from the paper.

Reversing time on demand

The researchers then attempted to reverse time in a four-stage experiment. Instead of an electron, they observed the state of a quantum computer made of two and later three basic elements called superconducting qubits.

Stage 1: Order. Each qubit is initialized in the ground state, denoted as zero. This highly ordered configuration corresponds to an electron localized in a small region, or a rack of billiard balls before the break.
Stage 2: Degradation. The order is lost. Just like the electron is smeared out over an increasingly large region of space, or the rack is broken on the pool table, the state of the qubits becomes an ever more complex changing pattern of zeros and ones. This is achieved by briefly launching the evolution program on the quantum computer. Actually, a similar degradation would occur by itself due to interactions with the environment. However, the controlled program of autonomous evolution will enable the last stage of the experiment.
Stage 3: Time reversal. A special program modifies the state of the quantum computer in such a way that it would then evolve "backwards," from chaos toward order. This operation is akin to the random microwave background fluctuation in the case of the electron, but this time, it is deliberately induced. An obviously far-fetched analogy for the billiards example would be someone giving the table a perfectly calculated kick.
Stage 4: Regeneration. The evolution program from the second stage is launched again. Provided that the "kick" has been delivered successfully, the program does not result in more chaos but rather rewinds the state of the qubits back into the past, the way a smeared electron would be localized or the billiard balls would retrace their trajectories in reverse playback, eventually forming a triangle.

The researchers found that in 85 percent of the cases, the two-qubit quantum computer returned back into the initial state. When three qubits were involved, more errors happened, resulting in a roughly 50 percent success rate. According to the authors, these errors are due to imperfections in the actual quantum computer. As more sophisticated devices are designed, the error rate is expected to drop.

Interestingly, the time reversal algorithm itself could prove useful for making quantum computers more precise. "Our algorithm could be updated and used to test programs written for quantum computers and eliminate noise and errors," Lebedev explained.

arxiv.org/pdf/1712.10057.pdf

phys.org/news/2019-03-physicists-reverse-quantum.html#jCp

Joshua Butler
Joshua Butler

"Mathematically, it means that under a certain transformation called complex conjugation, the equation will describe a 'smeared' electron localizing back into a small region of space over the same time period." Although this phenomenon is not observed in nature, it could theoretically happen due to a random fluctuation in the cosmic microwave background permeating the universe.

It seems the 2nd law of thermodydamics can be overcome on the quantum level

My calculations show:
It seems the law of collusion can be overcome on the quantum level of politics, and I can win in 2020

It turned out that even across the entire lifetime of the universe—13.7 billion years—observing 10 billion freshly localized electrons every second, the reverse evolution of the particle's state would only happen once. And even then, the electron would travel no more than a mere one ten-billionth of a second into the past.

This shows That I, Donald J Trump, have a snowball's chance in hell of winning 2020.

In other words, I could win this.

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Austin Garcia
Austin Garcia

(sac) here
I yam confoosed

A special program modifies the state of the quantum computer in such a way that it would then evolve "backwards," from chaos toward order. This operation is akin to the random microwave background fluctuation in the case of the electron, but this time, it is deliberately induced. An obviously far-fetched analogy for the billiards example would be someone giving the table a perfectly calculated kick.
Stage 4: Regeneration. The evolution program from the second stage is launched again. Provided that the "kick" has been delivered successfully, the program does not result in more chaos but rather rewinds the state of the qubits back into the past, the way a smeared electron would be localized or the billiard balls would retrace their trajectories in reverse playback, eventually forming a triangle.

Is this qubit in the exact same state as before it was altered?

Qbit A changes to qubit B at it travels microseconds into the future

evolution program is launched and "rewinds the state of the qubits back into the past"
Is the state of these 'B' qbits identical to the state of the 'A' qbits?

Or has this experiment just reracked the billiard balls?

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Aaron Hill
Aaron Hill

If the Jews are able to be so brilliant as to create a literal time machine then they DESERVE to be the MASTER RACE.

Cooper Garcia
Cooper Garcia

Alright, I have to ask. When they say
"Quantum Computer"
Do they mean an actual quantum computer, or do they mean a simulation of a quantum computer being run on a regular computer? Cause Im just assuming they are full of shit.

Ian King
Ian King

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Elijah Peterson
Elijah Peterson

They haven't even set foot on the moon. All bullshit.

Ryan Bennett
Ryan Bennett

Assuming anyone did.

Lincoln Jenkins
Lincoln Jenkins

quantum computer
Serious quantum computers are finally here. What are we going to do with them?

February 21, 2018 1 yr ago

glow worms have them already

technologyreview.com/s/610250/serious-quantum-computers-are-finally-here-what-are-we-going-to-do-with-them/

Tyler Thompson
Tyler Thompson

(I don't bow to you satan)
But they especially didn't. They are so bad at science that they can't even keep up with producing propaganda for the masses.

John Reyes
John Reyes

all this to run 4 qbits

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Colton Moore
Colton Moore

The fakest of fake news. The headline is just pure garbage.

Angel Campbell
Angel Campbell

754669
all this

1950 on the left
2018 on the right and the iphone is must more powerful

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Juan Thomas
Juan Thomas

And guess what this did to the user base?
must more powerful
Case and point.

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Evan Cox
Evan Cox

If the Jews are able to be so brilliant as to create a literal time machine then they DESERVE to be the MASTER RACE.
However it was invented by white people

Christopher Sanders
Christopher Sanders

So what you're saying is, if I ran a huge simulation with random, continuous, but stochastic functions as a result of a general equation describing that entire simulation…. I COULD TRAVEL BACK TO ITS ORIGINAL STATE?!

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Brandon Wright
Brandon Wright

You're better off making virtual qbits. I'm thinking that maybe those computers do something a bit more complicated. I'm hoping so.

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Joshua Gray
Joshua Gray

Diana!

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Charles Cooper
Charles Cooper

This thread is too smart for Zig Forums
I would move it to /tech/, but they are just as dense as Zig Forums users, but don't know it

Sebastian Ward
Sebastian Ward

You do know that the sun is not a serious paper, right? For American Anons it's basically the British version of The Weekly World News, with a sideline in softcore porn.

Ian Roberts
Ian Roberts

Theres no such thing as "random." Nothing exists outside cause and effect. Nothing. Its interesting to note that the smallest things we can see also just happen to be as small as they say things can get! Wow! (((Coincidence)))

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Nolan Ramirez
Nolan Ramirez

phys.org/news/2019-03-physicists-reverse-quantum.html#jCp

shit for branes

Benjamin Harris
Benjamin Harris

Truly fascinatin’.

Jack Jackson
Jack Jackson

actual legit

Samuel Flores
Samuel Flores

When scientists talk in analogies
Dark matter was an analogy used to describe a deficit in the results of relativistic equations.
It appeared there wasn't enough gravity for cosmic bodies, thousands of suns, to orbit each other in the way we observe daily, the way we know galaxies work because we can see them working. In fact, for our equations to make sense, there would need to be 5x more matter then we were looking at.

So some faggot called this deficit "dark matter" in his analogous representation of this equation, and the problem therein.

We now know that dark matter does not exist, and that little analogy was the biggest scientific blunder to ever exist, literally to the tune of 5x the density of our entire fucking universe.
Imagine being so fucking wrong your incorrectness weighs 5x as our entire conceivable reality.
When scientists talk in analogies
WE WARP TIME

Henry Wright
Henry Wright

time reversal
No it isn’t

William Turner
William Turner

real news

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