Creative Production on Linux (Audio/Video/Editing)

Eli Cook
Eli Cook

What do you use/how do you cope? Is there any hope for commercial solutions/VSTs that only support Windows/MacOS to get a Linux port?

Attached: music-producer-imac-setup.jpg (82.71 KB, 620x424)

Other urls found in this thread:

gentoostudio.org/
blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve
sex-meeting.com
bome.com/products/miditranslator
mediafire.com/file/jts36oycyahlxnx/pianoteq_stage_setup_v622.exe/file
tools.suckless.org/blind/
cs.cmu.edu/~music/nyquist/
youtube.com/watch?v=sfrZQzoC6zs
wonderunit.com/storyboarder/download
users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/
lilypond.org/
mega.nz/#F!DpAz2IgQ!nW7bPNnpJFk5CAV3ypiaHw
youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ

Austin Thompson
Austin Thompson

stop using commercial solutions and support the open source ones.

Josiah Carter
Josiah Carter

Video: Kdenlive
Audio: Audacity, LMMS and Bitwig Studio

Btw are there any DAWs for BSDs?

Adrian Roberts
Adrian Roberts

There's Fruity Loops on macOS :^)

Carson James
Carson James

Is AV Linux or that one av-oriented ubuntu still a thing? Used that back in the day.
As I recall, at one point in time "Hollywood ran on Linux"

Anthony Fisher
Anthony Fisher

I remember that, Hollywood used their own in-house proprietary applications though

Angel Cox
Angel Cox

I used to do some music production as a hobby, but most commercial plugins are distributed as magic proprietary DRM software that only has a 20% chance of running through WINE, and unless everyone magically starts using GNU/Linux, it's unlikely any of the companies in charge of those are going to do ports.

Audacity is ok for pure audio editing, but I have had issues with recording with pukeaudio. LMMS runs a lot better than on Windows, but it still has some issues that make it a pain in the ass to use (beat sequences suddenly disappearing in the GUI; time signature changes resize the entire timeline; parameter automation is awkward as fuck). I've only ever tried running other DAWs while running Arch but none of them seemed to work properly.

Kdenlive is about the closest thing to working video production on Linux, but even it has some stability issues. Everything else I've tried is shit. Openshot seems to expect you to slice clips using your mouse alone, and it has random memory leaks that make my computer freeze up after several hours; Shotcut likes to crash for no apparent reason; and both of them have amazingly horrendous performance when it comes to manipulating large clips.

For what it's worth, there's a modified Gentoo distro designed for audio workstations, but I've never tried it:
gentoostudio.org/

Jose Lopez
Jose Lopez

Check out supercollider, pure data, vcv rack, foxdot, csound, pyo if you want to make music on linux.
I believe coding music is the linux way of making music. DAW's is the windows/fagos way.

Ethan Phillips
Ethan Phillips

I put most of the Gentoo Studio packages on CloverOS and I'm considering making an optional kernel configured for audio. I might do that today. If there's anything I'm missing or shouldn't overlook, reply.

John Watson
John Watson

I believe coding music is the linux way of making music.
I agree but I'm not a big fan of existing solutions. Out of the ones I've tried, most of them were built for live performance and the ones that aren't are wonky and clumsy at best. I'd like something like a MIDI file but hand-writable, with more features and some conveniences like macros or reusable sequences. I've been thinking of the features and syntax I'd want for over a year; maybe I'll implement it some day. In the meantime, I'm thinking of using Lua's table syntax to build a toy prototype.

L = instrument{comment='Lead', voice="dave's cool piano 7", ...}
R = sound{comment='Rythm', voice='nailsonchalkboard.wma', ...}
B = bpm(230) -- or, roughly, seconds(0.26)
T = tuning(440, 'a-major')
nice_melody = {T, B*2, T+4, B*2, T+4, B, T+5, B, T+4, B, T+3, B, T+1, B*2, T+1, B*2, T+2, ...}
song = parallel{
{L, nice_melody},
loop{R, B},
}

The tables are flattened where possible, lengths of parallel sequences are checked and a state machine zips through the thing. Hitting an instrument changes the instrument, hitting a tuned note plays the current instrument, hitting a sound just plays the sound, hitting a time value moves forward in time. This is obviously an incomplete example but it shows the gist I think, e.g. there could be objects that cause notes to timestep automatically to reduce the timing (B, B*2...) punctuation.

Hudson Lopez
Hudson Lopez

Peak autism, a site to behold

John Green
John Green

*Sight

Tyler Stewart
Tyler Stewart

I'd be curious to know how you end up on Zig Forums if you think elementary programming is peak autism.

Christopher Fisher
Christopher Fisher

1005143
On second thought, keep doing what you're doing. This is better than a lot of solutions out there. Given the embeddable nature of the language you are working with you could incorporate this notation into a VCV Rack module. That would very a neat thing indeed to have live coding going on at the same time as analog-style patching.

Easton Scott
Easton Scott

I have never found any music production software on any operating system that I would consider acceptable so I just do everything in Python with numpy/scipy. The reason is that I don't like equal temperament and note frequencies are often hardcoded in audio software. In the few that aren't hardcoded they still don't support changing your fundamental frequency mid-song which is quite limiting.

Zachary Thompson
Zachary Thompson

For the little I need I use gimp for shoops and inkscape for diagrams (or tikz/latex depending what I want). I've heard blender is good with video but never used it.

Levi Martinez
Levi Martinez

Zig Forums is for anyone who likes technology, not just programmers.

Charles Kelly
Charles Kelly

Sure, but not in the sense of "I like showing off to all my friends", but in the sense of using and understanding technology. And you can't do much with technology without programming it.

Grayson Williams
Grayson Williams

Blender is most certainly NOT good with video.

i still use it though because I cant be bothered to lean something else.

Samuel Bailey
Samuel Bailey

Blender is good with video. The problem is you have to operate it in the ways of Blender. You can work very quickly once you've been trained in it but the training effort is quite significant.

Aiden Cooper
Aiden Cooper

tech nerds
being "creative"
kek

Gavin Flores
Gavin Flores

I am an amateur composer and video producer. I've been composing my music using LMMS. For video, I've been using Blender.

Landon Wood
Landon Wood

There's this one guy called ZUN and he has a huge volume of work.

Daniel Walker
Daniel Walker

Ctrl+F
no DaVinci Resolve
blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve
Now supports some major Linux distros.

Carter Moore
Carter Moore

gimped
it pains me there's no good PS alternative
krita is for drawing, pinta is in mono hell (and without the godly paint.NET plugins it serves little purpose) and gimp lives up to its name

Luke Brown
Luke Brown

update your gimp maybe?
GIMP now has the MyPaint brushes integrated, so it's now more like Krita++

Isaiah Martinez
Isaiah Martinez

Gentoo studio works fine, I've been using it for about 9 months. I'm mostly using it with Renoise and Supercollider.
I had to tinker a bit with jack but didn't run into any problems, it was easy to install for someone who never used Gentoo.
The distro stays really focused on audio, it comes with software for everything music related from sheet music editing to mastering without taking a general multimedia approach like kxstudio.

Jordan Bell
Jordan Bell

blender is good with video
is it as unstable and incomplete as Kdenlive? I'd be willing to learn the Blender Way as long as it was a stable and featureful video editing platform

Gabriel Turner
Gabriel Turner

I'm an amateur trained by Youtube so I don't know how well it compares to anything. I don't know what is the professional grade language and techniques for video editing and production. All I know is that Blender video editing is sufficient for little video advertisements, the kind where you have a few video clips clipped together and you have text flying in an out.

Isaiah Cruz
Isaiah Cruz

I've made music using Ardour (DAW), Hydrogen (midi Drums), and Guitar Rig (VST fx). It all worked great; the PROBLEM was JACK audio. It never saved the configuration properly, so every session began with 5 minutes of routing ports. It was a major impediment.

My Razer Blade 15" came with a free copy of FL Studio and I haven't looked back. It's ridiculously fast and polished, and just a 10x better experience.

Jayden Lewis
Jayden Lewis

audio
i have no fucking clue
NLE video editing & 3d models
blender

Charles Miller
Charles Miller

I use Ableton for my music production and I refuse to switch to anything else.

Tyler Collins
Tyler Collins

honestly JACK sucks, and there should be MIDI bussing in pulse, the problem with that is pulse sucks and alsa sucks and all audio is a hot pile of shit.

Levi Ward
Levi Ward

I tried LMMS and wanted to kill myself so bad that I pulled out an old machine, installed win 7 + FL Studio

Austin Sanchez
Austin Sanchez

So are all sound servers made for Linux shit?

Brody Diaz
Brody Diaz

audio sucks dick on linux, everything sucks dick on linux, kdenlive is the most stable and capable video editor and it's a piece of shit that crashes if you look at it wrong. everything fucking sucks and i refuse to use windows

Brayden Diaz
Brayden Diaz

correct. I don't think pulse will be fixed, the next generation of pulse is pipewire, also redhat, and it's supposed to be a multimedia server, so just running ffmpeg on the root x window to stream desktop to whatever output will not be possible (debatable if this is actually good, and it's needed for any output on wayland) but I haven't seen anything regarding supporting digital multimedia workstation software so soon starting JACK will take out your webcam too.

I think the bad audio and colour APIs are the main reason why adobe isn't on linux. Sucks, but that's just how it is on this gay earth.

Kevin Jackson
Kevin Jackson

sndio is pretty decent

Dylan Lopez
Dylan Lopez

Only on BSD where it can run without ALSA

Jordan Taylor
Jordan Taylor

Here Girls Always Want to Fuck - sex-meeting.com

Jace Flores
Jace Flores

abandoned but underrated: SEQ24, it did things right. simple, stable, generic midi hardware approach.

most linux DAWs just seem terrible.

this guy is more the right idea with Linux

I like to pick up and use old hardware a lot, and sell it to buy more when I get bored. Best use of Linux for me has been to emulate old OS's so that I can do things like control everything via the MOTU

FWIW I got a Mac book pro from my job, I installed ableton on there and still never use it. Just sits there.

Attached: IMG-2174.JPG (544.65 KB, 1632x1224)

Juan Anderson
Juan Anderson

<3 renoise

Hunter Bailey
Hunter Bailey

I kinda dream of making linux a renoise based sequencer and a ardour based harddisk recorder. Like, no plugin bullshit, just midi sequencing, orchestra hit samples, analog synths and lexicon outboard.

Juan Wilson
Juan Wilson

Where can I do something like
while(i != a# || cb) if (j == c||a) new harmonicMinor(A).set(1,4,rnd(parentScale),1,5,1,6,7).insertAt(typeof minor || major);

Thomas Morgan
Thomas Morgan

Try pyo.

Josiah Russell
Josiah Russell

It would be awesome to have a ncurses based tracker with vi bindings.

Jaxson Ward
Jaxson Ward

OBS for recording, Kdenlive for editing, and Handbrake for uploading (only used if necessary).

Sebastian Cox
Sebastian Cox

I use Bitwig Studio and Milkytracker alongside some external synthesizers/effects, and about 10 GiB of drum machine samples for music making. Bridging VSTi's over to Linux is not very reliable so unless you work primarily with samples and/or external hardware you probably won't enjoy have a good time.

Andrew Morgan
Andrew Morgan

Speaking of audio.
Why does audio on linux always crackle when I change the volume on a video? Or otherwise?
Why does my headphones pop like a motherfucker when I open audacity to use it with my focusrite sound card? The thing clearly works otherwise.

Attached: 1379249809.jpg (125.14 KB, 1520x1080)

Jacob Long
Jacob Long

I remember when I was distrohopping I experienced same issue. Try to remove/install pulseaudio.

Sebastian Cook
Sebastian Cook

Why does audio on linux always crackle when I change the volume on a video?
If you're on PA, maybe change your module-suspend-on-idle timeout or just disable the module altogether (but read its documentation first either way). If that solves nothing, maybe some settings are improperly set. Sub-optimal buffer size or latency? Not sure why those would cause your problem but check them anyway. On PA, you would look at the buffer and fragment settings. Otherwise, it might just be poor buffer handling on the application's side, especially if you don't use said application's primarily targeted sound server.

Brandon Morgan
Brandon Morgan

Post your specs so I can tell you about how you need better hardware.

Ayden Morales
Ayden Morales

Dual boot with an offline Windows 7

Dominic Moore
Dominic Moore

more stuff like what this guy says, i too believe coding plus gnu plus linux go hand in hand. someone make a blog style post pls

Charles Phillips
Charles Phillips

also incorporate this guy in blog post, idgaf about live performance

Colton Gutierrez
Colton Gutierrez

BASED as fuck, ur also included in Zig Forumss music blog post

Justin Allen
Justin Allen

In summary, pls do this guys. I play only acoustic instruments (piano and guitar) and every now and then I go through a spurt of wanting to step up my game and start composing. But I already spend enough time on the computer, and changing my workflow from analogue acoustic instruments to having my nose back in a GUI based computing experience makes me want to vomit. But I want to create, so please come up with a sufficiently comfy solution.

Jaxson Jenkins
Jaxson Jenkins

Lastly, I love Boards of Canada, William Ballinski, etc.. So for most of what I’d like to create, electronic fluency is a necessary prequisite. But dear god I just want screen time minimized, and time spent using a shitty GUI interface counts doubly so imo.

David Campbell
David Campbell

I think my issue is that the vast majority of DAWs have really clunky interfaces (i.e. click, or worse, double-click to place a note, click to extend a note or worse, click on a tool to click on the note to extend the note). I'd be interested in a DAW with a vim-style interface.

Jace Stewart
Jace Stewart

I done a few simple videos in openshot
The interface is simple and crude.

Cameron Cooper
Cameron Cooper

If you can afford it, build a separate workstation just for your DAW sessions and use a big ass touch screen monitor built into the desk; Ableton and FL Studio both come to mind as having touch screen modes.
Short of that (or in addition to), get a nice MIDI controller. You can perform most recording tasks without ever touching the keyboard or mouse.

Lincoln Harris
Lincoln Harris

i already have a midi, and i’d love to use it. but the software is so atrocious. i’ll look into what you recommend, thanks for the time.

Carson Collins
Carson Collins

midi controller software sucks
Yes I had a similar problem. There is a nice piece of software that will let you arbitrarily map and route your MIDI data. inb4 shill bome.com/products/miditranslator
I had to use this software to get my Presonus Faderport working with FL Studio.

Nicholas Ross
Nicholas Ross

it's a Poettering-ware specific problem. Never had this problem on Gentoo with -pulseaudio USE flag or in *BSD
Cargo cult way to fix it is by adding
options snd_hda_intel power_save=0
to
/etc/modprobe.d/snd_hda_intel.conf

Attached: poettering-death-choke.jpeg (13.27 KB, 480x360)

Nathaniel Rogers
Nathaniel Rogers

Yes. If it sequences a Moog Modular you could set it up on a screen as big next to it.
There was something like that though (for modern linux), it fails to run on my machine though.

Charles Gray
Charles Gray

If you can afford it, go analog

Adrian Williams
Adrian Williams

any hope for commercial solutions/VSTs that only support Windows/MacOS to get a Linux port?
Probably not, but airwave is a pretty good bridge for windows (wine) -> linux with jack audio.
I am using pianotech 6, myself and it works really well with carla.

mediafire.com/file/jts36oycyahlxnx/pianoteq_stage_setup_v622.exe/file

I originally posted this in the "private tracker" thread.

Anyway, jack audio is your best asset. ardour is pretty good, etc nondaw is pretty good too. carla is good, everything is good, really, just needs more support and polishing.

Hudson Martinez
Hudson Martinez

i think this is, ironically, the only tech approved way to go here. all the software options are dogshit and my gut tells me they always will be (just my opinion).

what are some cool analog tech things? maybe tape recording some ambient field noises? lol

Jaxon Stewart
Jaxon Stewart

i mean other than synthesis and acoustic instruments

Adrian Flores
Adrian Flores

i really wanna see more musicians workflows examined up close, from people like Boards of Canada and William Ballinski

Mason Jackson
Mason Jackson

I'm getting babbys frist guitar in a couple weeks. I can't wait to not install guitarix or any of the other Linux software amps/plugins because jack and pulse absolutely ravage my system any time they come into contact. is right.

Zachary Walker
Zachary Walker

Where can I learn the ways of video cuts using Blender? I'm a VirtualDub migrant and for the last couple years I've ended up using ffmpeg to manually and imprecisely cut video by time stamps after tracking in a video player. I want my frame-precise cutting back, but last time I tried Blender it was so confusing I gave up.

Luis Long
Luis Long

Try kdenlive

Attached: 1435306250888-2.jpg (106.39 KB, 1024x679)

Josiah Allen
Josiah Allen

Just donate to WINE so they can create a decent layer where to run your Win32 software. Everything else is a pipedream so far.

William Perry
William Perry

WINE
Not really viable for live monitoring because of added latency. Best to just have an offline Windows box at that point.

Levi King
Levi King

Video: Kdenlive
I can vouch that this thing does a better job than Adobe Premier. It supports a wider range of formats than Premier's very narrow support for anything that isn't used for TV/Hollywood. KDen may be unstable, but fuck it does such a better job that Adobe Shitsmeer.

Hunter Flores
Hunter Flores

Overall I'm quite pleased with the art software available for Loonix:
Music
Musescore for music notation
Deflemask for a chiptune tracker
Drawing
Krita
AZPainter

David King
David King

someone please post or link me a video tutorial or example workflow. I am interested in the styles demonstrated in these post:

Angel Cook
Angel Cook

added latency.
How so? Just don't use poetteringaudio

Austin Morris
Austin Morris

Kdenlive is pretty good, but transitions are a hit or miss and idk why it manages basically everything else fine.

Attached: megalomissya.mp4 (3.72 MB, 720x1280)

Zachary Myers
Zachary Myers

Have you tried unplugging it and then plugging it back in?
Sometimes static can ruin audio.

Eli James
Eli James

It's all lies you doofus. Except the tracker one. That's a legit autist who thinks ncurses is some kind of usable UI, priceless stuff.

Kayden Roberts
Kayden Roberts

If you're playing a live instrument through an audio interface to record a track in your DAW, through an FX plugin, then routed out to your headphones (live monitoring), you need to have it under 10ms latency or your ear will notice it is out of phase, and you won't be able to play along with drums, and your performance will just generally suck. It's hard enough to get low latency without a virtualization layer, and pretty much impossible with it.

Jason Roberts
Jason Roberts

not true (other than the ncurses autist), and it turns out supercollider is my wet dream

Ryan Jones
Ryan Jones

hey idiot have you tried supercollider?

Joseph Morgan
Joseph Morgan

Interesting. I used a guitar tablature program back in the day an experimented with adjusting the pitches of notes a few cents here or there to try different termperments. It was ridiculously time consuming and more of a math exercise, but a lot of fun. Haven't heard anybody talk about this kind of stuff before or since I did that and brought it up with that community.

Isaiah Johnson
Isaiah Johnson

can't you do this in supercollider?

Henry Brown
Henry Brown

Probably a retarded question, but is there something like a plugin for either GIMP or Krita that lets you open SAI files? I want to ditch wine+Paint Tool SAI and use only foss tools for art but don't want to convert a shit ton of them to PSD.

Ryan Moore
Ryan Moore

not editing videos with a hex editor
pleb

Zachary Williams
Zachary Williams

tools.suckless.org/blind/

Oliver White
Oliver White

For most people, kdenlive will do the job. If you think you need Hollywood shit, there's DaVinci Resolve

Logan Walker
Logan Walker

LISPFAGS BEHOLD

cs.cmu.edu/~music/nyquist/

Program your sounds in a Lisp!

Oliver Cook
Oliver Cook

If you can afford it, go analog>>1009787
example workflow
youtube.com/watch?v=sfrZQzoC6zs

Alexander Perry
Alexander Perry

I can’t, but I think someday I’m going to try to make a stand-alone synth with a Raspberry Pi (or a more performant, lower latency sbc) with custom functions from Super Collider or Nyquist.

The only analogue equipment in my price range is a MicroBrute. But I think I’m happy doing some Lisp hacking in Nyquist for now.

Nathaniel Brooks
Nathaniel Brooks

Not writing hymns to music based in DIVINELY ORDAINED RNG in TempleOS.
GITDs I swear...

David Taylor
David Taylor

I hated the cacophonous tunes in the Temple OS demos the most.

But I realize that this is a joke post, so yeah.

William Garcia
William Garcia

how hard is it to make a supercollider/csound/nyquist powered raspberry pi semi modular lookin synth box

Joseph Butler
Joseph Butler

it also has to have a patch bay

Bentley Gomez
Bentley Gomez

When Terry gives you lemons, you make a delicious lemon sorbet.

Attached: TempleOS-Hymn-Risen-(Remix)---Dave-Eddy-IdYMA6hY-74.webm (7.54 MB, 1280x720)

Adam Perez
Adam Perez

Its lack of a cache and preview slowness makes it hard to use.

Evan Perry
Evan Perry

FOSS trackers, synths and ffmpeg allow you to do basically anything. Just glue stuff you find yourself using with shell scripts.

Henry Collins
Henry Collins

pro·gram·ing
the act or process of planning or writing a program.
Nowadays, you can do pretty much whatever you want with just configuring and,the occasional scripting. Writing actual programs isn't needed amymore in most fields.
In fact, web developers make good buxk coding pages without having to ever program any browser or framework themselves.

Andrew Jenkins
Andrew Jenkins

I barely do any video editing, but for the few hours I've used kdenlive, I didn't have any problems on ubuntu.

Juan Gray
Juan Gray

the more hardware you have the better; i.e. if you work with real instruments, mics, synths, drum machines, effects, etc.
If you treat linux like a pro-tools studio before everything was VST there is nothing holding you back.
If you work with audio more than midi you're in luck, for beat-makers this means using lots of loops and sample packs.
If you don't work this way you have to be old school or forward thinking/experimental.
It require lots of time to find a workflow, don't expect the ableton/reason/garageband experience.

The selling point for lunix audio is modularity, but then to have persistant sessions you need a session manager like LASH/LADISH, which I've never got to work.

ARDOUR and REAPER are the most mature and familiar traditional daws, best support for mixer controller hardware and OSC.
qtractor: best minimal DAW, qt interface can be confusing.
LMMS: acceptable for midi, but uses the retched fruity loops 7 interface, mixing sucks but good piano roll, step seq is shit.
seq24: passable, alsa only, no metronome, some quirks, needs session management.
non-daw: meh but makes sense in theory just seems cumbersome
hydrogen: it kinda sucks, but is close enough to what I want.
calf-plugins: great quality but stability issues, many crashes
guitarix: one of the better audio programs on linux
TAL Noizemaker: sadly one of the best soft synths.
zynsubaddfx: the best softsynth, but the editor sucks, there is a new version worth looking into
misc stuff I use: oxefm, obdx, TAL plugins, synth1 wine, drumkv1

soft samplers suck in general and my biggest gripe.

TLDR; if you're an electronics/beat maker you need to be advanced and do everything by hand.

Luke Ward
Luke Ward

heres my puredata magnum opus, it is pure vanilla pd and for very small screen.
it is multi-timbre polyphonic modular synth with patch saving / recall.
I havent touched it in over a year and the menu/knobs is bugged so I haven't released it.
posting from windows sorry.

Attached: Capture.PNG (15.44 KB, 720x232)

Jack Price
Jack Price

Also there's libresprite for pixel art

Easton Jenkins
Easton Jenkins

FL Studio through wine or virtualbox and the same with Sony Vegas, literally only sane options
<m-muh LMMS!
open LMMS
samples actually midis that sound like from some fucking 1$ chink kids toy
can't add any song to a playlist, cut it couple times and stretch it (i.e. to make vaporwave)
looks like dogshit
<m-muh audacity!
make your music literally blindfolded today! (can't do shit without these "set value" windows, aka in real time or something)
<m-muh Kdenlive!
works like ass, GUI is better than most video editors on Free Software side (OpenShot, or Pitivi, god these looked like diarrhea done by some sumo wrestler after a weak of not-shitting and eating just extra-spicy mexican food)
<m-muh ffmpeg! lets be minimalist!
Try to make montage parody or ytp in this crap, even if you somehow manage to, then there's always the horrendous rendering time
so yeah

Jordan Mitchell
Jordan Mitchell

If you're going to go for proprietary software, look at Reaper as well. They offer support for Linux users on most versions, historically through Wine but also more recently as native packages (though I've not tried them).

Levi Hall
Levi Hall

FL Studio through wine or virtualbox and the same with Sony Vegas, literally only sane options

Wine is absolutely not sane especially when you work with external VSTs. Stability goes out the fucking window then. Bitwig is far better than Fruity Loops and is native on Linux. Additionally, plugins are sandboxes in case one of them does take a shit.

Camden Butler
Camden Butler

I unironically use audacity for recording spoken word. Blender is good if I need to whip up a quick render of a product or send off for a prototype mold. Gimp has also served me well in the 2D space.

Justin Martinez
Justin Martinez

ctrl-f sunvox
not found
This really deserves to be more popular

Attached: sunvox28.png (59.77 KB, 802x625)

Jack Ortiz
Jack Ortiz

what's the best audio synthesis tutorial?

I tried synthorial but it's only windows, and dunno if I can run it with wine.

Colton Allen
Colton Allen

Thanks for reminding me about sunvox, reminds me of the good ol days of pc software.
The audio world is 99.9% sales/marketing, .1% R&D.
Even in the FOSS world evangelism has made bloated crappy software more popular.

Brody Garcia
Brody Garcia

Linux port
Desktop linux is such a clusterfuck that no business will provide commercially produced software for it.
Not only does each distro fuck up the default paths, like /tmp for temporary builds might be under ~/.package-name-here instead, but the real kicker is that the packages themselves, the actual software is so poorly maintained, designed, and implemented that there is no way for a commercial supplier to provide competent support when something wrong happens.
It's easier for large software companies to focus on the big two, Windows and Mac, and leave the rest of the OS's to fend for themselves.

This is why Linux or BSD's will never be number #1 on the desktop.

Connor Fisher
Connor Fisher

niggerlicious, delet this

Sebastian Myers
Sebastian Myers

Did avisynth/vapoursynth ever get a proper Linux port that's been promised for over a decade now? Is WINE support any good? I really enjoyed using scripts to edit video back in the day but had to leave it all behind when I gave up Windows many years ago. I've yet to find anything as powerful as avisynth for video work.

Eli Reyes
Eli Reyes

Why would you say this? It's not entirely true and, when it is, isn't something exclusive to Linux. Just take your file path example, for instance. You do realize that Mac and Windows both have plenty of clusterfuck software attached to them that do the same thing, right? Add that to the fact that all a company really has to worry about is targeting Snaps/Docker and I really don't see what case you really have.

Jaxson Gonzalez
Jaxson Gonzalez

You are not making any argument.
With Windows and Mac, most programs do not need to be compiled, so there aren't a bunch of temporary build files laying around randomly consuming disk space.
Look at config files on Windows and Mac, especially Mac, are located neatly in a familiar area.
With Linux, you don't know if it's in some _hidden_ folder or if it's in /etc or /opt or wherever.
Snaps/Docker are not targetted nor designed for desktop users.

Alexander Robinson
Alexander Robinson

Decide to install Windows
Try and then buy FL Studio with money I got from some web development
Release over 10 albums in a couple of years

Feels good. Truth is I became much more productive after going to Windows, not only on music stuff but on development stuff.

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Isaac Brown
Isaac Brown

10 albums of noise music are still 10 albums of trash

Liam Thomas
Liam Thomas

What is Linux Standard Base and freedesktop defacto standards?

Lincoln Allen
Lincoln Allen

There is commercial support for Linux, but it's typically catered around Ubuntu. This is a sensible approach, as it allows developers to focus on a predictable target while utilizing an open desktop's greatest attribute, which is open collaboration community support.

If you're unable to adapt the software to your system, you ought not to be tinkering in the first place. At the end of the day it's still better than wasting your time with canned answers from Pajit, because let's face it, the "big two" are AWOL or trying to be something that no one really wants.

The commercial offerings that do exist are great and these things take time. I honestly don't expect macOS to be around much longer as long as Cook is still in charge, and Microsoft is too busy trying to be Apple and spreading themselves extremely thin.

Kevin Flores
Kevin Flores

stop using commercial solutions and support the open source ones.
The problem with that, is at the current stage, no open source solution can be used for actual work.

Consider Blender. Some professionals use Blender. So due to this, money comes in and work gets done to make Blender even better, and it can be used for work. If you want to get work done, a case can be made for Blender. There are people for which Blender is better than say, Maya. But there are no people for which Kdenlive is better than After Effects. Zero. Not a small minority, fucking zero. You could only make a case for Kdenlive as "you REALLY love open source, like you have such an autistic passion for it it's a fetish at this point". That's the case for Kdenlive.

As long as that's the case, money won't come in, and development won't be done.

Blender is most certainly NOT good with video.
Can fucking confirm, god fucking dammit what a load of crap the video editor is. The rest of the software is awesome though.

Thomas Reyes
Thomas Reyes

it pains me there's no good PS alternative
this. my only need for WINE at this point

suit yourself. i've had someone jack off to a song i made in audacity. i find non-windows, non-apple more customizable and therefore can make it convenient and comfy, which is creatively great for me.

Jose Phillips
Jose Phillips

What is Linux Standard Base and freedesktop defacto standards?
Not important enough for every distribution to adhere to.
Those commercial "options" you discuss aren't targetted to Linux as an ecosystem but only focus on one distro, Ubuntu, effectively acting like an additional competitor against Linux itself like Mac and Windows. Even Android is a competitor to Linux at this point.
inb4 >but it use duh linux kernel
Can you use an Android apk on a fresh LFS install?
Community contributions aren't that great. This is why Linux is in the mess that it is, because community contributors just do enough to get it to where they like it and expect someone else to fix everything else for them, which quite often doesn't happen until years afterwards or the project dies.
I honestly don't expect macOS to be around much longer as long as Cook is still in charge, and Microsoft is too busy trying to be Apple and spreading themselves extremely thin.
Holding on to hope, I see.
There will still be iOS, and Windows will be around for decades to come purely for legacy support.
You should worry about whether desktop computers will still be around in the next 10 or 20 years and less on the operating system.

Samuel Parker
Samuel Parker

Look at config files on Windows
I don't know about Mac but I've seen Windows config files end up in roaming/local (devs often don't understand the semantic difference), the user's home folder, the user's documents folder, the public documents folder (which is a major faux pas), in the program's own install directory, in Application Data, in some random folder in C:\ (rarer nowadays) and others. Sometimes it's hidden but you'd be silly to have hidden folders actually hidden on any OS. It's usually faster to start procmon to find config files than to read the documentation or to look through those locations yourself, unless you know where they're gonna be (e.g. I know that Flash saved object files are in the user's appdata/Macromedia/...). On the Linuxes and BSDs I use, the package manager can tell me what files it installed where with a single command. Additional, run-time configuration is rare and usually ends up in the user's folder (rarely anywhre beyond a dot-file in the root or within .config) and when it doesn't (e.g. for services), manpages are available. There's many oddities to Unix-like environments but some exceptions withstanding, configuration is very sane.

Nathan Diaz
Nathan Diaz

Not until there is an API (syscall) available that allows programmers to write and read configuration files without worrying their FS location, there won't be any sane configuration method on Linux.

Isaac Nguyen
Isaac Nguyen

Is that a fucking Buzz clone user? Also, someone needs to write a *nix VST wrapper already, I mean shit, I lived long enough to see X-Screensaver ported to windows, VST to *nix shoud be any time now...

Logan Jackson
Logan Jackson

I thought there was news about this a while back. Not that I bother with music on linux much now. I wasted too much time compared to just dual booting and doing my shit there.

Asher Anderson
Asher Anderson

What are you even talking about?

Kevin Carter
Kevin Carter

I had already said focusing on one distribution is the most sensible thing to do. It's too commonplace for an entity to just give up before they even start because of the vast array of distributions. It's better to support one district well than to halfass support across the board. Porting hasn't been an issue for me at all (I don't use Ubuntu but I use commercial software that normally comes in a deb file). If you can't make it work for your distribution, you're better off using something like Windows/Mac anyways.

Your comment about Android was out of left field. No idea why you included that.

I'm not worried about the desktop going anywhere. People have been posting videos about the death of the desktop for a decade now, all from their video editing suites on desktops. Integrated devices with ecosystems are black boxes that enterprise won't even touch. I have seen some DJs with iDevices and have even been to one ameteur studio that used only iPads. Even still it was for capture and automation and not post production. I have yet to see a professional studio without a desktop.

Christian Russell
Christian Russell

A simple syscall in Linux that opens the config file.
Instead of opening it manually and having to put in the path, which could be anywhere, the kernel handles creating the path in a standard place and returns a file descriptor or pointer to a FILE struct.
At least it would create conformity through a central source instead of depending on the community, multiple sources, to adhere to standards and practices, which many don't.
I had already said focusing on one distribution is the most sensible thing to do.
But that's not Linux. That would be writing software for Ubuntu or Mint or Gentoo or whatever.
That just ignores the issue without providing any solutions to the problem.
Your comment about Android was out of left field.
Android is a distribution of Linux, yet you cannot use apk's on non-android distributions.
Android is now a competitor to Linux just like Windows and Mac are.
Very simple to understand.
I have yet to see a professional studio without a desktop.
You are using anecdote as a generalization.
Desktops are already losing market to mobile devices. Look at the numbers. More people access websites and the Internet through mobile devices than desktops. That only took 10 years to happen, considering from the release of the iPhone in 2007.
Within the next 10 years, manufacturers will either reduce or eliminate their products for desktop markets while bumping up their production for mobile.
There is too much money in eliminating the desktop and locking consumers into mobile devices.

Easton Jenkins
Easton Jenkins

no professional is gonna work on a fucking tablet, and if you dock that shit to use certain input devices you might as well use a desktop that gives you more performance at the same time (without haviing to worry someone is gonna steal that shit)

Oliver Thompson
Oliver Thompson

i use vmware with photoshop and premier.
Fuck the haters, it just works.

Jaxon Phillips
Jaxon Phillips

no professional is gonna work on a fucking tablet
They already do.

Jace Peterson
Jace Peterson

saved

Gavin Sanchez
Gavin Sanchez

You're conflating grandma's Facebook experience with the AV industry?

At this point you seem like you're in the wrong thread. You're painting broad strokes based on internet polls which do not represent the topic industry in the slightest. Consumers may be willing to lock themselves down with iDevices, but again, that just isn't happening in the professional world.

Nobody plugs a preamp into a tablet, and nobody does mastering in their living room on integrated speakers.

Levi Hughes
Levi Hughes

Nobody plugs a preamp into a tablet
The tablet IS the preamp
the rest of the post is fine though

Ryan Brown
Ryan Brown

Professionals; e.g. doctors, lawyers, chief management officers, these people use tablets and prefer them because they allow for a small form factor "computer-like" device that accesses their records quickly and effortlessly.
The A/V industry will fall in line when they are forced in line.
Even program development will be moved over to tablets and walled gardens.
Do you think I want to see the desktop computer die? Hell no, but I am sure not going to delude myself after reading the writing on the wall.

Nathan Lewis
Nathan Lewis

man thanks again for the suggestion, I've been using it a lot over the past couple days.
This is almost exactly what I've been looking for, while it has quirks its a great paradigm

Gabriel Jones
Gabriel Jones

Does storyboards fit in this thread? There's a ToonBoom Storyboard alternative called Storyboarder. It does things just fine and can do animatics too.

wonderunit.com/storyboarder/download

I also love their statement as to why it's FOSS. teehee.

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Nathaniel Walker
Nathaniel Walker

Checking out their github
not available in my distro's repo
You've failed me for the last time, Arch.

Adam Myers
Adam Myers

It's an appimage, who cares?

Elijah Taylor
Elijah Taylor

A good thread and the year's just started.

I used ableton and flstudio on windows - some time ago. Trying to use what's there on linux now. Qtracker seems nice and minimal, ardour seems like a good thing to record with. Audio and MIDI routing via JACK is miles better than what I remember doing on windows. Well laid out and organized and seems to just work. Driver support for the shitty TASCAM US-122L seems broken apart from MIDI, but I'll just use it for MIDI output right now.
All in all not bad, but I'm having trouble getting used to ardour. I do like the interface in general, but I'd rather route streams via qjackctl than through that blocky-thing interface. Downsides would probably be that the state is not saved in the project file itself and ardour devs can't expect everyone to use a GUI for jack. Biggest con to ardour: everything seems to take longer than it should, subjectively. I still like Abletons workflow the most, by far, and I don't think it's an aquired taste. It just feels very efficient and experimenting on things yields results. With Ardour I never use the "smart" selection feature, it only gets in the way and basically never selects what I want. Also you have to use your keyboard for frequent tool changes. Or at least toolchanges seem a little more frequent than necessary for me.
Can't afford it right now, but is Bitwig studio worth the price in general? Or Reaper?

Also what's the short version of VST/LV2/LDAP differences? Just remember everything being VST last time I used any of that.

Nice. I'd like to play around with an MS-20 one day. And nothing goes over the warmth of a Rhodes.

Last time I used a tracker, I used milkytracker. Wondered just now if there's something that is used like a tracker, but can record and arrange audio like a regular DAW. Seems like there is: users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/
Hard drive audio recording and playback
AU, LADSPA, VST, and VST3 plugins
scheme or python scripting
microtonality
global swing
Pure Data language embedded, Faust environment
multicore support
Not bad. Anyone tried this?

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Kevin Gomez
Kevin Gomez

Never helps, it's literally only a thing when I explicitly change the volume though, for example on a youtube video.

Ethan Murphy
Ethan Murphy

I just installed gentoo. My wacom tablet worked immediately. No drivers, nothing. It just werks. I'm impressed.

Aiden Johnson
Aiden Johnson

Never mind. Error. LiveDVD. Gentoo seems to take quite a long time to ACTUALLY install. Real no brainlets allowed software.

Chase Reyes
Chase Reyes

Attached: Deus-Ex---Main-Theme---Impulse-Tracker.webm (9.03 MB, 854x480)

Liam Cruz
Liam Cruz

People are remixing the extracted mid files from TempleOS (go to archive.org)
I was thinking of doing this also a few months back, but I enjoyed Terry's schizo pieces as they were. Good work here though.

Landon Fisher
Landon Fisher

Kek, all those channels and still doesn't match old school Amiga 4 channel tunes.

Attached: Hired-Guns-Music-From-Amiga-g2XNAo3Lqxk.mp4 (10.85 MB, 480x360)

Charles Evans
Charles Evans

I tried Radium a while back. Got it working on windows but for some reason it didn't really click with me. Now tbf I was trying out a bunch of DAWs because I got this idea that using Renoise for like 8 years had limited my musical ideas. I still think that a bit but I couldn't find another DAW that I liked even half as much.

Asher Fisher
Asher Fisher

You've got shit taste and also autism, m8

Joshua Barnes
Joshua Barnes

16 bit audio already accomodates everything from silence to hearing damage, 24 bit audio supposedly gives you more volume to play with but then again 16 bit already accomodates everything from silence to hearing damage, but 24 bit is supposedly still useful for mastering the audio.
Why then, do we need dither when downsampling from 24 to 16 bit? The dither itself is described as a little bit of white noise added to the audio, wouldn't that be even worse than aliasing your volume a little?

Also, when you downsample audio, if frequencies over about 20khz are beyond human hearing range, let's use 96khz -> 48khz downsampling as an example. Why can't we just simply remove any frequency that is over 40khz instead of using all those algorithms people came up with to resample audio?

I'm a brainlet who's new with this stuff, pls explain.

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Brody Morgan
Brody Morgan

Nah, it's just 96dB of dynamics (in reality more like 90dB, because one of the bits is basically just sign, which doesn't increase amplitude), while the difference between the threshold of hearing and pain (let alone hearing damage) is at least 140dB.
Why then, do we need dither when downsampling from 24 to 16 bit? The dither itself is described as a little bit of white noise added to the audio, wouldn't that be even worse than aliasing your volume a little?
Read about a phenomenon known as quantization noise (it's an issue precisely because 16-bit is not nearly enough to make the transition to "silence" (i.e. below the threshold of hearing) smooth enough.

Nathan Smith
Nathan Smith

Way to miss the point, faggot. Spamming a bunch of noise in dozens of channels doesn't make "music". It's impressive for idiots, just like complexity in code impresses them, or talking about 144 Hz HD monitor, when I'm fine with a fucking plain old CRT and 320x200. The irony is YOU'RE THE AUTIST WHO NEEDS ALL THAT COMPLICATED BOTNET BULLSHIT.

Jaxson Taylor
Jaxson Taylor

We've got amazing capabilities in our hands now, regarding sound synthesis. You don't have to buy analog synthesizers and circuitry anymore, if you don't have the money or don't want to. There's so much good stuff available for free now, times have never been better for someone interested in making music. With that comes complexity, but I fail to see how that's a bad thing. DAW's are easier to use than ever before and there's so much resources if you want to learn.
Reducing sound synthesis to the least common denominator isn't going to make music more well understood. If you want to reduce input for the listener to a minimum, read some orchestral sheets and tell me how that's bad and overly complex music. Everything about that is impressive - from the overall orchestration, to recurring themes, to the skill needed to play the individual instrument, to the mind creating such a piece, to the sheer mass of instruments. Yet I don't see how being impressed and moved by that makes me an idiot.

Carter Murphy
Carter Murphy

Yeah okay faggot. Enjoy getting fucked by the cianiggers. Some people can't be helped. Go fuck yourself.

Thomas Baker
Thomas Baker

Thanks for proving me right, but on a functional board your post wouldn't have survived long enough for me to read it

David King
David King

Fucking cianigger confirmed. Go fuck yourself, cunt. God said 640x480 and 16 colors and a PC speaker. Your modern botnet shit is subversive garbage and you're a fucking cianigger shill! FUCK YOU HOMO!

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Caleb Martinez
Caleb Martinez

Do you produce anything or are you just here to shit up the thread? Assuming good faith, there's plenty of ways to digitally compose without resorting to FL Studio Cloud™ AND without having to go to cheaply produced chips from the 80s (or emulators thereof). While I personally happen to enjoy the sound of chip tunes and find the medium's restrictions conducive to creation, you'd have to be way up your own ass to think it's the apex of audio. For example, SuperCollider or ChucK are interesting modern takes for live performance. There's also plenty of free and Free DAWs and DAW/tracker/etc analogues like

Oh nevermind you're either brain damaged or trying to troll.

Mason Butler
Mason Butler

Look you fuckhead! directly insulted me, so WHY THE FUCK ARE YOU MAKING EXCUSES NOW WHILE PRETENDING TO BE ALL FUCKING SO MORALLY SUEPERIOR! YOU FUCKING SHITHEADS ARE ALSO HYPOCRITES! SHITBAGS!

Cameron Nelson
Cameron Nelson

IF YOU CAN"T FUCKING HANDLE AN INSULT< THEN DON"T DISH THEM OUT, FUCKEHADS!

Luis Perez
Luis Perez

ruining the sacred hymn with garbage electronic "music" shit
Niggerlicious.

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Chase Kelly
Chase Kelly

This one better?

Attached: Terry-Davis'-TempleOS-Hymn---Risen-(Acoustic-Guitar-Version)-aIpkXAGTE40.mp4 (2.27 MB, 640x360)

Hunter Cooper
Hunter Cooper

I DEFINITELY don't want that in Linux. You could do it like with $PATH but what you're suggesting is simply bloated and unecessary.

Samuel Young
Samuel Young

It is not bloat if it is necessary, and it is definitely necessary given the nature of how shitty programmers are with """"""free"""""" software and adhering to de facto standards. It simplifies the creation, modification, and removal of configuration files instead of needlessly relying on the install or make script to print out where the files are along with the possibly thousands of other files placed wherever they feel in the file system.

Luke Gomez
Luke Gomez

placed wherever they feel in the file system
Not really. The system wide stuff is to be found in /etc and the user specific setting in ~/.*
And sure, some applications provide examples somewhere in /usr/share but they usually say that in the manpages.

Jack Barnes
Jack Barnes

These are places you _expect_ to find them. Nothing requires them to be in those places however. Look at how many different directories X.org checks for configuration files before defaulting. If the kernel would supply a simple interface for configuration files, it would make everything simpler and easier to use.

Jace Bailey
Jace Bailey

that sounds like the windows register to me. dont want that on linux

Leo Harris
Leo Harris

It has nothing to do with Windows "register". All it is to provide a simple interface for programs to create configuration files, modify them, and remove them as needed. You can still modify the config files with whatever text editor you want. You can still browse to the folder and fuck shit up if you so desire. What it doesn't do is create additional complications for new users when moving to Linux.

Aiden Barnes
Aiden Barnes

Dithering takes place below the precision of the least significant bit. Think about it like this: without any noise, a value x<0.5 always rounds to 0, x>0.5 always rounds to 1. This is deterministic, so you lose most of the information in that range. What if you add statistical noise? A value like x=0.1 will have a high probability of rounding to 0, x=0.3 less likely, and so on. Although this low order bit has become noisey, it's not humanly noticeable and you've actually preserved more information. If you boost a quiet section of a 16 bit recording with no dithering, you will hear a buzzing quantization noise, which sounds similar to clipping. The noise masks this, by preserving more of the perceived dynamic range below the LSB.

You might be a bit confused about sampling rates. Due to nyquist theorem, a sampling rate of 48khz can represent at most 24khz. Think about sine waves; if you sample a sine wave at the same rate as it's frequency, (once per full revolution,) you see a constant value, which is heard as silence. You need to sample the sine wave using at least double its frequency in order to capture a peak and a trough. This way you'll get alternating positive and negative values.

As far as downsampling goes, removing the frequencies above the nyquist limit is exactly what we do, not just because of the limits of human hearing, but to prevent artifacts. In the 96khz -> 48khz case, we need to remove as much of the frequencies above 24khz as we can and then discard half of the samples (96/2 = 48). If we do not discard these samples prior to removing frequencies above 24khz we get aliasing noise. This is a consequence explained by nyquist theorem; when you try to represent frequencies that are greater than the rate of sampling, they will create 'aliases' that appear to be of a lower frequency. Think of a video of a tire or propeller spinning so fast that it seems to stop (reaches the video's nyquist rate), and then appears to start rotating in the opposite direction (the rotation speed exceeds the nyquist rate). In audio, high frequencies are reflected back into the audible range, so a 25khz signal would introduce a 23khz alias. If you had a lot of loud signal above 24khz, you would end up with a loud mirror image below 24khz which sounds extremely unpleasant.

But ultimately, downsampling is just about removing high frequencies so that the signal can safely be resampled at a lower rate. To remove frequencies we need to use filters, and there are many kinds of filters which all have different properties. Some are fast to compute but produce imperfections (simple IIR filters and small convolution FIR filters), others are expensive and highly accurate (large convolution FIR filters using a lanczos/sinc kernel.) There are a wide variety of problems that can be introduced (latency, phase/time-alignment problems, subtle aliasing, and so on) so it's just a question of what trade-offs you're willing to accept, hence the large number of different algorithms all suited to different use cases. If you're creating a synthesizer with 2x upsampling, and you need to downsample in real-time, using a 4096-sample FIR would introduce a delay of about 45 ms which would be unacceptable for a musician to perform with. You'd be much better off with something faster and lower latency, like a butterworth filter. On the other hand, the FIR would produce highly accurate results for offline rendering, so you could switch between the two depending on the context.

Henry Mitchell
Henry Mitchell

So if those frequencies always mirror like a sinewave does that apply to the data before during storage as bits on a recording medium, or during playback as it passes through the physical hardware to the speakers?

Where are those high frequencies being introduced is what I am trying to get at. Is it at the recording phase, during transportation from physical to digtial via cosmic rays/other interference, or during playback from digital to physical via audio hardware/drivers/software?

If those high frequencies are only being introduced by changing the bitrate of the stream then why fuck with the stream at all and not just leave the data on the disk at the original bitrate and get better audio hardware for the sake of pleasent hearing?

Or why record at say 24 bits if all audio hardware supports 16 bit so that nothing has to fuck with the bitrate?

doesn't this mean you could hide messages in the whitenoise of the audio that gets left from imperfect sampling then? Like morse code via 1's and 0's in the white noise or something worse then that?

Christopher Wright
Christopher Wright

You always want to record and mix with the best quality possible and then sample down the end product so the source material is richer, has more of everything. Just like you wouldn't record to MP3. Also frequencies below or above human hearing can often still be felt.
Producers often refer to 128khz as more "tape like and analog feeling". Artifacts reach an acceptable level when they're inside the nyquist condition (twice the frequency) but when you increase the sample rate even more, there will be even less artifacts.

Jacob Adams
Jacob Adams

Ok let me rephrase the question. Let's say I as a audio producer want to produce and send the highest quality audio undithered and unchanged to a persons speakers. Should I on the software side record at the bitrate the speakers will output at? Say my recording equipment/software supports 16/24/32 but the output speakers the listener will use only supports 16. Is it better for the listeners experience to record at 16 and send it that way or to fuck with dithering/sampling/container formats in software and record at 32 bits or whathave you?

By the way is there anything that will phsyically affect the audio during transportation and storage that will demand it be dithered like cosmic rays or defects in the silicon of recording/playback hardware or some such shit?

Nathan Reyes
Nathan Reyes

Is it at the recording phase, during transportation from physical to digtial via cosmic rays/other interference, or during playback from digital to physical via audio hardware/drivers/software?

All of the above, minus the cosmic rays. Audio recorded from an amp or microphone or any analog input has no theoretical limit to how high the frequencies can go, because it is a continuous signal. Of course natural sound sources tend to become quieter the higher the frequency range you look at. Dogs and other animals can of course hear things well above 20khz, so it's those kind of things that you're protecting against by filtering an analog signal before sampling it to get a discrete signal.

If those high frequencies are only being introduced by changing the bitrate of the stream then why fuck with the stream at all and not just leave the data on the disk at the original bitrate and get better audio hardware for the sake of pleasent hearing?

idk, depends what you mean. If you're saying everyone should buy $200 sound cards to playback a massive 100MB 96khz wav file, then I guess you're right. In reality I'm pretty sure the most pragmatic thing is what we're doing already, which is to downsample to something reasonable like 44.1khz or 48hkz and distribute that. It's smaller, easier to process and playback, and it's not like anyone was going to hear those higher frequencies anyway. The sound engineers couldn't have even heard them.

By the time you've got that file, the majority of the high frequencies have been removed. The only remaining reason for resampling is to put the audio in a form that can be used by your sound card. Some files are recorded at 22khz,32khz,48khz but you need to get it in a form that the hardware will accept. The average sound card only supports a fixed set of sample rates and bit depths.

doesn't this mean you could hide messages in the whitenoise of the audio that gets left from imperfect sampling then? Like morse code via 1's and 0's in the white noise or something worse then that?

You might be able to do something like this, but I'm not sure how you'd get the morse code back out. You could do it by subtracting a higher bit-depth copy of the source audio to recover the noise, but then it would be pretty trivial, basically a one time pad. Can't think of any practical and/or devious applications for that one.

Short answer is that it's not really important.
The difference between 24 and 32 bit is practically indistinguishable, and is basically lossless for all a human listener could care about. Even 16 bit is pretty good, and you are only going to hear some buzzing if you turn up the volume REALLY LOUD on a section that is REALLY QUIET. (to the point where the signal is grazing those least significant bits.) No one will ever be able to hear the effects of dithering listening to a piece of music at a sane volume.

Best bet would be to distribute 24-bit dithered. If you knew for certain your listener had a sound card that only outputted 16-bit, it would technically be better to send them audio dithered for 16-bit playback, but negligibly. Dithering in itself is entirely optional, and kind of autistic once you get beyond 16 bit. More importantly, if somebody has a 16-bit only sound card and they listen to a 24-bit sound file, there going to lose virtually nothing, and it's possible that the drivers might do some dithering in the conversion anyway. On the other hand, going from 16-bit to 24-bit means that you're not taking advantage of a full 8 bits of precision. Using 24-bit is the best option for both cases, and it preserves the most information.

And dithering definitely won't protect against cosmic rays and all that, if that happened (pretty rare I think), the damage would be a lot more noticeable.

Nicholas Lewis
Nicholas Lewis

And just to make things make a little more sense: dithering is done by engineers for archival purposes, it's not for enhancing the listening experience. Basically, it's only valuable if you need to re-master the mix without re-doing the entire thing. It just theoretically reduces the decay in quality over multiple iterations of remastering archived material.

Brayden Hill
Brayden Hill

I'd like something like a MIDI file but hand-writable, with more features and some conveniences like macros or reusable sequences.
Lilypond suits this type of musical autism perfectly. lilypond.org/

You can programmatically generate both sheet music and MIDI files using a LaTeX-ish syntax.

Ian Rodriguez
Ian Rodriguez

I suggest you use the highest profile since the equipment has the most power over the quality than the software "stated" 24/16/32. Who knows what kind of workarounds they do behind the hardware or the software they provide? Just use the highest one and start from there.

Think of trying to put huge cheese inside a small container. If you tried to eye trimming such cheese before putting it in the container there will be gaps but if you just shove the container into that cheese you'll have less gaps. Why use a cheap 16bit sound recorder in the first place? There will be more room for error margins caused by such weak equipment.

That also happens in video/audio.
Most android phones sound shit and only produce up to 16bit 41kHz but if you listened to my cheese example some of the bits will be 'dropped' because the hardware is too weak to handle that not to mention other audio streams happening inside an android phone just steals more of the quality room. However if you have a 32/24bit 192kHz soundcard phones like Sony, LG, or Samsung you will enjoy much better audio quality just like the cheese example. The hardware can also handle lots of audio processing and have lower latency.
Try playing back a flac on a 16-bit 41khz cheap noname soundcard on a noname android phone and you'll hear the dead ass difference after trying out Samsung or LG flagships.

Recording at 16 will just ruin the quality of the master. You should record higher regardless of "muh dog hearing" and believe it or not MP3 or at best AAC is still the king for lossy/downsampling and it is well-tested that you won't have 'gaps' from continuous gapless playback while other shitty coding formats with their respective decoders do this insane "rounding off milliseconds" not to mention how these shits like OPUS actually fuck up the bpm around the end of the song when played side-by-side with the master,AAC, and MP3 format at the same time.

Bentley Davis
Bentley Davis

Who knows what kind of workarounds they do behind the hardware or the software they provide?
Well if I am using hardware I have the schematics to and software that is open source/I can audit, I do.
believe it or not MP3 or at best AAC is still the king for lossy/downsampling
Holy shit I just went and tested it and you are right. Starting a song in libopus-1.3 made and ran music vs the original the beat got off by like a tenth of a second towards the end of the song. It wouldn't have ever been noticeable to me if I hadn't started the original and the opus one at the same time, which I usually listen to opus because of. I still think opus is better in every other metric besides that one point though for its compresion/size vs quality ratio.

Luis Brooks
Luis Brooks

I updated to the latest ffmpeg and audio playback software available for me, even going out of the way to build it by source, and it didn't fix it. REEEEE THIS IS GOING TO BOTHER THE FUCK OUT OF ME NOW THAT I KNOW OF IT. FUCK YOU AND FUCK OPUS.

Liam Sanders
Liam Sanders

Opus is a meme popularized by cuckchannel.

Wyatt Jenkins
Wyatt Jenkins

For the purpose I am using it for its not a meme, that is to save space on low space/memory devices. But it bothers the ever living fuck out of me the beat is off now and I am thinking about just saying fuck it and only listening to originals and screw mobile music with high quality audiocard/headphones.

**also opus for internet traveling sound is better if its created on the fly i.e chat/voice clients/servers.

Kayden Moore
Kayden Moore

Using Opus for non-music-oriented Intenet radio, audiobooks and podcasts is also a great application. TL;DR; Opus is okay for non-music purposes.

Isaac Brown
Isaac Brown

Starting C++ development soon. Should I use Clion or VisualStudio?

Attached: cpp.jpeg (40.63 KB, 854x493)

Jason Lewis
Jason Lewis

VS

Noah Clark
Noah Clark

name one better lossy audio format

Dylan Clark
Dylan Clark

Nice bait.

Use vim and compile with gcc

Attached: 9492c10157f9a30204ba368ab91185d940bfe7836be373b0a1edc8872194c1f4.jpg (41.8 KB, 400x400)

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