Camping Supplies/Weapons

Austin Nelson
Austin Nelson

We need a nice, big thread with pictures of ALL the good camping items including:
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Axes
Knives
Saws
Tarps
Camouflage Clothes
Bags/Packs
Guns
etc.

Here are some pictures of the things that I want.
A wish list, if you will.

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Other urls found in this thread:

web.archive.org/web/20041214153427/http://www.armalite.com/library/techNotes/tnote64.htm
fromthetrenchesworldreport.com/alternative-gun-cleaning-solvent-and-gun-cleaning-oil/70411
m4carbine.net/showthread.php?3756-Armalite-Tech-note-on-lubrication
varusteleka.com/en/product/terava-jaakaripuukko-carbon-steel/56524
worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Finland/finland_2.html
woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2013/09/living-off-land-delusions-and.html
rei.com/product/870075/snow-peak-personal-cooker-3-cookset
rei.com/product/668927/snow-peak-titanium-multi-compact-cookset)
rei.com/product/830774/gsi-outdoors-pinnacle-dualist-cookset
varusteleka.com/en/group/canteens/879

Jace Morales
Jace Morales

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Aaron Russell
Aaron Russell

the tree hammock and the camo mesh is high on the list

Julian Hughes
Julian Hughes

Also, in desperate situation for food, what would be better, a bolt action long range accuracy rifle, or an automatic, low caliber rifle. both with the same power scope?

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Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher

In desperate need of food you should rely on small game more. Do you want to shoot a hare of birds with a .308 so you can scrap what remains of them from nearby surroundings?

Connor Howard
Connor Howard

A hare OR birds*

Ian Martinez
Ian Martinez

Should have posted in:

Michael Watson
Michael Watson

That's exactly what I was thinking about. In all honesty, a .22/410 combo would be perfect for that.
I've never been long range, big-game hunting, so I'm not sure what the right range of killing is, but i've seen some stellar accuracy from a .22 caliber rifle with a 6x scope
For small hares and squirrels, I want to use a trapping system anyway

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Thomas Ortiz
Thomas Ortiz

If we are talking about big game, then from what I've learned you should avoid shooting further than 100 meters because of the increased risk of missing vitals.
If it's small game to they say that 25 meters with a 12 gauge shotgun is the absolute maximum if you want a quick kill.

Bentley Hernandez
Bentley Hernandez

Dont use a knife with a leather sheath, user. Yeah, they look better and such, but when the leather gets wet (it will) then it is holding moisture against the blade. Its fine if your just dicking about for a day or two, but if its a prolonged time its quite a problem. Synthetic is the way to go, sadly.

Lincoln Ross
Lincoln Ross

So does anyone here actually have any pictures?
It's okay, to have a wishlist…

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Liam Sullivan
Liam Sullivan

does anyone know any good external frame packs that have an integrated camelbak? I like having a couple liters of water that you don't have to worry about and just sip throughout the day and during the night.

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Nolan Morris
Nolan Morris

I dunno about integrated, but most modern packs have a pouch in them specifically for hydration bladders. Any reason you're going for external vs internal, incidentally?

Gabriel Davis
Gabriel Davis

Idk. do you think internal is better or something?

Wyatt Stewart
Wyatt Stewart

Never forget: some motor oil.
You can use it to oil your guns, to make sure your tools won't rust, to cool your saw when cutting wood in a dry environment and many other things.

Jace Parker
Jace Parker

Forgot the pictures. Liqui Moly forever.

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Joseph Reyes
Joseph Reyes

Gonna suggest you guys forgo the folding wood saw and just get a arborist or landscaping pruning saw. Easy to strap to your pack while walking, easy to strap to your belt when collecting wood. Longer saw blade allows you to cut much larger logs/limbs. Silky makes good ones but are a bit expensive (professional equipment) but Corona makes a good lightweight climbing saw that's like 30 or so dollars.

Also for trapping, don't forget rat traps exist. Drill a couple of holes. Tie it to tree trunks to get squirrels, tie it off to to a rock and set it for rabbits/hares.

Matthew Rogers
Matthew Rogers

Hatchet or Axe for temporary camp sites?

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Camden Powell
Camden Powell

Using one item in different ways is also a virtue. For example
Tents
Sleeping Bags
Tarps
Camouflage Clothes
Bags/Packs
This is all one thing.

A large 6x8ft tarp, folded in a specific way, and supported by paracord, can be turned into a duffel bag for storing things.
The same tarp can be suspended between trees to serve as a combination tent/sleeping bag that is comfy, resistant to floods, insects and other parasites.
Also if it is camo, it can serve as a hunting blind or a ghillie suit.

Bentley Moore
Bentley Moore

6x8 isn't even really enough.
either you have a small tarp for staying dry, or a really large one for multi purpose.
personally, I like a good pack that can carry a lot of weight comfortably
t. armyfag

also, a boonie is a must have for me.
What is Zig Forums preference for headgear?

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Leo Jenkins
Leo Jenkins

You can do the same thing with CLP or really just about any oil. In theory you could use olive oil if you're willing to completely strip and clean everything every 3-12 months.
I want a calendar now. Why can't we have naked chicks for our motor oil companies?

Andrew Wilson
Andrew Wilson

If I'm innamountains or innadesert I prefer a cowboy hat to maximize sun protection without looking like too much of a fag since I already get like 3x the solar radiation of Fukushima on a daily basis being outdoors. If I'm just going innawoods or somewhere urban, a ballcap is preferred since it provides protection from eye glare and I generally don't need the extra back of the neck protection if I keep sunscreen with me and stay in semi-shaded spots.

Brody Murphy
Brody Murphy

1 inch webbing bro. Get some rappelling rings and carabiners and you can do some next level shit. Can also nigger rig a decending rig but I would be in dire straights before I risked doing it.
Rig comfy pull straps for large logs.
Rig pulling line with mechanical advantage.
Use to make tree climbing loops.

I like me a good boonie hat. Bandannas are indispensable btw. Those tube scarfs are nice but you want the thin ones for summer and thick ones for winter.

Jackson Morales
Jackson Morales

I wish I had a camelbak filled with olive oil. It's so good.
bandanas and shemaghs are necessary accessory

what Zig Forums opinion of mess kit and burner?
I dont prefer a burner but atitanium 5-piece kit is pretty comfy

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Julian Carter
Julian Carter

What type of boonies have you used?
I have one that is a size too large and it is frustrating.
here's the one I want.
Just a typical boonie with a stiff brim that stays flat and can be locked in place

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Lincoln Bell
Lincoln Bell

As for my contribution, I'd suggest at bare minimum a $20 auto toolkit or homeowner toolkit including a screwdriver, pliers, zipties, a clean cloth, hex keys, etc. Pics related are absolute garbage, but if you're a poorfag you should at least have one of these for like $20-$30. They will come in handy for a lot more than just quick fixes for your car, especially the homeowner toolkit.

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Chase Lopez
Chase Lopez

I don't like aluminum for cookware but that's just me. Titanium is fuck all expensive so I can't blame a guy. Burners are only good if you expect to have the fuel the entire time you're out. Folding wood stoves are a good option though, seen some advertised as rocket stoves but never tried them out.

No clue, had one from a surplus store that I used for years but can't find anymore.

A good hatchet and saw will do fine for a temporary camp. Unless you want to split large and knotted wood, don't worry too much about bringing a full sized axe.

Aaron Foster
Aaron Foster

Does the pack you have enough PALS for you to put the bladder on the outside in a pouch?

Austin Adams
Austin Adams

Not exactly better, just personal preference. They tend to be less bulky and less likely to snag on things. Also, there's a lot more variety to choose from compared to externals, so it's easier to find the features you want—you're looking for a Camelbak pouch, and just about every modern internal frame has one of those.

Sven saw my nigger, these things are great for portable woodcutting. Also, these hand chain saws are the shit for quickly cutting small to medium size branches.

Hatchet should do you just fine, although if you're going to be in an area for a longer period (four days to a week) and don't care as much about weight, I'd recommend a three-quarters axe as well. Either way, go for one that's all one piece with a steel handle, you can abuse the shit out of it and don't have to worry about the head coming off.

Any kind of full-brim hat will do, but I prefer the synthetic ones over leather as they breathe better. Also bandanas are a must, if you can get one with hydrate salts sewn into it, much better at retaining water.

what Zig Forums opinion of mess kit and burner?
If you plan to have access to fuel, get a Jetboil. If you want a SHTF burner get one that burns wood, I've got one from a company called Biolite. Maybe there are better ones out there, I don't know, but this one's worked fine for me. For mess kits, don't overthink it, I use this plastic thing the Swedes make and it's worked just fine.

OP, I know you asked for personal pics but I just finished packing all this shit away yesterday and I can't be arsed.

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Carson Ramirez
Carson Ramirez

tents
I like my Alps Mountaineering personally. Top-notch warranty (you just send in the broken part and they'll give you a new one, no questions asked), rainfly is covers the whole tent, and vestibule area is very generous. It also packs up real small for how roomy it is. And the poles go into these hooks instead of sleeves, which I like for several reasons. First, it's much easier to get the pole attached to hooks over running it through a sleeve. Second, sleeves tear easily while the hooks are more durable. Third, if one or two hooks do break you don't lose any functionality, whereas as soon as a sleeve rope it starts giving you problems as the pole will always, always get caught in the rip. I've been using this tent for ten years and it's still going strong.

sleeping bag
Really going to depend on the climate, but it's better to err on the side of warmth—you can always unzip or lay on top of the bag if it's too hot, but you can't make a cold bag warm. Down vs synthetic is a matter of taste; I prefer synthetic, it's a bit bulkier but if and when you get your sleeping bag wet it's both easier to dry, and will still function when wet. Whereas with down, once you get it wet it's staying wet until you come home, and it loses all insulation.

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Daniel Smith
Daniel Smith

What's your opinion on that one Zig Forumsommando who usually posts in these threads about how civ polymer tents are completely unreliable and that only heavy canvas army tents and tent-ponchos are worth using in bugout situations?

Xavier Powell
Xavier Powell

motor oil

For lubing an AR, Armalite recommended automatic transmission fluid as a substitute for CLP in the 70's, and recommended 15W40 for lubricant.

…in fact, any heavy diesel oil would be awesome for lube, since a rifle is like a very slow cycling diesel piston.

Isaac Rogers
Isaac Rogers

Full disclosure, I haven't heavily considered bug out situations and only camp a week or two at a time, so take my words with a grain of salt.

First, about army gear: remember that it's made by the lowest builder that can meet certain requirements, not necessarily "the best." And the Army's requirements never list all criteria, most notably there's almost never a weight requirement. I'd say that argument makes sense for the lowest tier of nylon/polyester tents, like what Coleman offers. Those are only good for short trips and nothing serious, and while they may be heavier, canvas tents will far and away beat them in durability. But with more expensive civvie tents, you're getting durability that's a lot closer to canvas (but still clearly inferior, don't get me wrong), but still has the weight savings, ease of setup, waterproofing, and fabric longevity (it might rip easier, but it won't rot the way canvas does) of synthetics. Overall, I'd say canvas is good for tents that are meant for long-term use (multiple months in a single location), but if you plan on taking down and setting up repeatedly, civvie synthetics are better. A good compromise is to get a nice nylon tent like the one I posted, but use it with a canvas groundcloth to maximize the longevity of the floor, which is where you're most likely to see a tear form in your tent. Just make sure the ground cloth is a little smaller than the tent footprint. I've seen a few "hybrid" tents that are mostly nylon with a canvas floor, but none in backpacking format.

Brayden Carter
Brayden Carter

Source? That sounds like fuddlore.
Hurr Durr I use motor oil 'cuz it's cheap
Herp a Derp it's all the same stuff

Henry Sanders
Henry Sanders

Oil serves two purposes with firearms:
Prevent oxidation by creating an air/water seal
Lubricant (preventing friction on a microscopic level)
It's not fuddlore, you can legitimately use just about any oil for this purpose. In theory you could lubricate your firearm with a stick of butter. The issue is that not oils are created equal and some have lower burning temperatures than others (like that butter), some are more slippery, some go rancid faster than others, some will schlick out of your firearm after a couple reloads, etc. In practice if you just wanted to leave it on the shelf and mind the shelf-life of the oil you used, you could oil your gun with whatever the fuck you want. For all intents and purpose, gun-specific oil/lubricant will be better for your gun, and automobile oils will be your next best choice. This is because they're designed for rough metal parts moving around a lot/at high heats or extremely cold temperatures without gunking up. I wouldn't recommend ever using cooking oils since they tend to either burn at low temperatures which will foul up your firearm, solidify if it's not hot enough, or offer poor corrosion resistance, but in theory you could if you cleaned it properly, chose one with a high flash point/low solidifying point, and completely stripped and re-oiled your firearm every so often to prevent fouling/corrosion. The benefit of firearm lubricants is they tend to have additives that are MEANT to gunk up your gun at the microscopic level so it doesn't end up like grease on a moving rail collecting on the edges. If you're looking to lubricate then motor oil is very good. The only place motor oil fails compared to gun oil is that it's usually not meant to prevent oxidation (at the level of gun oils) since it's designed for a tight environment inside the engine where you're not supposed to have much oxygen getting in, in the first place.

Jacob Powell
Jacob Powell

Fuck forgot video related. Vegetable-based gun lube.

Ryan Brown
Ryan Brown

Is just oil good, or is it necessary to use grease of some sort on the sliding surfaces? I'm usually a "Ballistol for everything" kind of guy, which from what you've said so far sounds like enough.

Thomas Mitchell
Thomas Mitchell

I like the woodland version of that one. The clip up sides make me feel cooler.

If you're on the move a fire can be a hassle so I always bring my single burner stove. It packs up light and one canister of propane lasts forever.

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Nolan Cooper
Nolan Cooper

Source? That sounds like fuddlore.

web.archive.org/web/20041214153427/http://www.armalite.com/library/techNotes/tnote64.htm

fromthetrenchesworldreport.com/alternative-gun-cleaning-solvent-and-gun-cleaning-oil/70411

m4carbine.net/showthread.php?3756-Armalite-Tech-note-on-lubrication

15W40 is personal experience on F88 AuSteyr, F89 Minimi, MAG-58, and M2HB-QCB from my days back when I was in uniform years ago. Worked better than CLP on all counts, including carbon removal, especially in dusty conditions.

Lincoln Lopez
Lincoln Lopez

We were told that marine grease was recommended to use during amphib ops.
Not that I ever got to do that myself.

Nicholas Brown
Nicholas Brown

I need to get a small one, for purifying water.
After hearing about all the pathogens in running water sources, I'm going to go with multiple methods for purification.
I've heard good things from MSR
Sock liners…anyone use them?
What about gaiters/low profile shoe? I've heard that SF uses it on special ops like UBL
just curious

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Matthew Bennett
Matthew Bennett

purifying water.
This thing is the shit. Boiling works fine as a backup but it's not nearly as convenient as one of these things. MSR is breddy gud, but my personal preference for water boiling are Jetboil stoves.

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Noah Adams
Noah Adams

You ever used aluminium pans to cook before? I bought a set of pots and pans, then when I took it home and opened it, a slip of paper fell out, warning about not cooking anything acidic in them as it fucks up the aluminium and gets into your digestive system.

Caleb Rogers
Caleb Rogers

Have you spent much time innawoods?
my whole thing is being tactical and not leaving a trace, but also not being able to easily be found.

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Brayden Hernandez
Brayden Hernandez

My Jetboils have aluminum pots. I mostly use them for coffee and boiled water, but they're anodized and supposed to be cook-safe for everything. Not too familiar with the aluminum cookware controversy, but I know the supposed health defects were only in elderly patients, after decades of everyday exposure. I'm not really qualified to say whether they're truly safe or not (my guess would be there's some risk, but the usual consumer hysteria has overblown things), but as long as you've got some kind of coating on your stuff it shouldn't be an issue either way.

I've been going about 15 years if we count the time I was an underage v&. It's always been more about enjoying the outdoors than being tactical, so while we're pretty good about not leaving a trace as far as cleaning up the area afterwards, I don't have much experience in remaining hidden while set up.

Xavier Brooks
Xavier Brooks

aluminum works but gets dented easily and soot and residue will stay in the pan. ive been wanting to try titanium just for its vanity value.
cool. I'm interested in learning about survival and stuff from Zig Forums anons, and being tactical is just a byproduct; you'd be amazed how much wildlife you can sneak up on while wearing camo and facepaint. I've had foxes, coyotes, and deer look at me from 20 ft and not move. One thing that is difficult though is being heard/smelled.
tom brown said that as a boy, his test was to sneak up on a deer and wrangle it by the neck.
Are tracking boots a meme?

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Grayson Bennett
Grayson Bennett

Lifestraws are pretty good. Not sure how long they will last, but I drank a glass of pond water with one. Pond water actually tastes good

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Tyler Walker
Tyler Walker

Oh yeah, them or something similar are pretty good if you need something you can just throw into a pocket or daypack. The Platypus I posted earlier is basically a heavy-duty lifestraw, it's just meant to filter several liters at a time, and uses gravity instead of suction. For either one, though, make sure you backwash the filter regularly—running filtered water back through the system will flush gunk out of the filter and make it last much longer.

Brayden Anderson
Brayden Anderson

They're good to about 260 gallons of water. Being small and compact enough, I think having two on hand would be more than sufficient for personal survival. Down side being it can't carry the water with you and filter on the go like an inline filter in .

Bentley Richardson
Bentley Richardson

The problem with that is it doesn't deal with viruses, toxins or heavy metals. Also I'd rather have something that can filter water on demand, instead of when I'm sucking on it. It's a bit homoerotic a single gay joke is going to kill millions of people.

Besides you can make a filter if you're not retarded. It's the simplest thing in the world, multiple levels of coarse and fine grain silica sand to weed out bacteria, some charcoal to mop up the heavy elements, and bam you have clean drinking water. I'd boil the result to get rid of hardier viruses if that's a risk, but otherwise it's clean.

The only reason niggers are dying is because they literally can't stack pebbles and sand into layers on top of some charcoal.

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Bentley Long
Bentley Long

Its because rich white people keep taking vacations to Africa to dig wells for people that should have the logistical reasoning that clean water is needed for survival.
Same reason the Congo, with the most fertile soil in the world, relies so much on food aid that farmers can't make money.
CAUSE RICH WHITE PEOPLE REFUSE TO LET AFRICA PROGRESS ON ITS OWN! BECAUSE THEY WILL SPEND MILLIONS OF DOLLARS ON SOME DIRT VILLAGE THAT NEEDS TO RELOCATE! INSTEAD OF HELPING THE POOR IN THEIR OWN COUNTRIES!

Also, I second the boiling the filtered water. Filtering is for large shit. Boiling is for living shit.

Jacob Morgan
Jacob Morgan

Sawyer makes a not! Lifestraw that can screw onto a pouch water bottle if that's what you need, but I'd still suggest a gravity filter (either the Platypus or a homemade one like ) for a more complete filtration.

Too true, pic related.

Also, I second the boiling the filtered water. Filtering is for large shit. Boiling is for living shit.
Eh, in most cases that's overkill. Maybe if you made your own filter out pebbles and sand and want the insurance, but the Platypus (and I would assume other reputable filters) are made to kill bacteria and the like.

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Lucas Cox
Lucas Cox

Forgot my pic like a tard.

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Christian Ross
Christian Ross

How long do commercial filters (Lifestraws, Sawyers, etc) last for before you have to replace them? How long can they be stored for? Can you use them after years of storage? Or do you have to use them in a certain time frame?

Ryder Russell
Ryder Russell

Oh of course, those good commercial filters don't require/need boiling. But for a field built filter system, its better to be safe than sorry.
Waterborne shit is nasty but easily avoidable, as someone with GI issues after a bout with lyme's disease and the resulting bleaching of my gut bacteria from antibiotics. I NEED TO BE STUPID PARANOID ABOUT WATER AND FOOD PREP INNA FIELD! It is very possible and only adds a little bit to the entire process but damned if I get something nasty.

Matthew Fisher
Matthew Fisher

top post
has anyone tried pills or chloring to purify water?
I did the coleman two step pills and it tasted fine, the only downside was that it used a lot of pills for one giant water container and I still did'nt even use enough by coleman's standard

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Cameron Jenkins
Cameron Jenkins

When I was in the army we got small white chlorine tablets we used to purify 1 liter of water at a time.
It tasted like chlorine water afterwards but we didn't get the shits and no one died from failed kidneys, so I guess it's working as intended.

Easton Ross
Easton Ross

It tasted like chlorine water afterwards
That means there was urine in your water, just as a heads up.

Nathaniel Russell
Nathaniel Russell

First pic is literally what they use in the city mains, it's just poured in by the gallons instead of with an eye dropper. Kills anything living, but it doesn't deal with toxins or heavy metals.

Tyler Perry
Tyler Perry

chlorine tablets
hurr durr theres piss in your water
So if I use bleach to kill germs in my water it means theres piss in it? Retard.

Ian Gutierrez
Ian Gutierrez

not storing piss in jars to throw at threats for increased damage

Adam Bennett
Adam Bennett

I got an aluminum mess kit and a Jetboil like has. Is aluminum safe to cook from? I heard that it has some long term consequences. Also I want to ask if he has boiled water using his Jetboil but without the gas. (Such as on top of a small wood stove)

Mason Lee
Mason Lee

This is a good thread. I'm liking the water filtration options. I keep a life straw around for emergencies but a more heavy duty setup like that platypus seems neat.

My current want/curiosity is this all in one overcoat/shelter thing called a Jerven bag. Looks like a bivvy sack you wear.

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Aiden Stewart
Aiden Stewart

I've heard a buildup of aluminum can cause alzheimer's. But it's literally in most antiperspirants so we're already fucked user.

Matthew Hughes
Matthew Hughes

A life straw saved my ass one time. But I prefer the sawyer setup now, it's better in every way, besides perhaps not being all self contained.

One thing I always carry now no one has mentioned is wire, plain iron wire, I wrap probably 10feet around a few 3inch nails and it's useful as fuck. Makes lashing shit together easy, you can use a nail as a lever to twist the wire tight, and it doesn't melt or burn like other cordage so it's useful for hanging pots. I guess you could make a snare too, but I've never tried. Weights just a few oz, it's worth it.

Also I love my "jungle" hammock I got on banggood for $5, just a big net made of slightly smaller Paracord with 2 rings. Holds my 200lb ass up and is tiny.

Aaron Gray
Aaron Gray

here. I've heard the same stuff about aluminum, but here's what you have to remember: that shit is unconfirmed, and while it's certainly good not to be too callous about your health, most of the things that are "suspected but unconfirmed" in science and medicine end up being giant nothingburgers. See: cell phones causing cancer, artificial sweeteners causing cancer they're still far from great to eat, but for other reasons, and so on. Aluminum cookware is the same, some researcher suggested the correlation in the 70s, but there's no evidence beyond that. Second, you're rarely if ever putting your food on raw aluminum. Jetboils are hard-anodized, as is most aluminum cookware you can buy, so there's nothing to worry about there, health risk or no health risk. And even untreated aluminum pans, if you managed to find one somewhere, isn't going to be raw aluminum–it will be aluminum oxide on the outside layer, which is a very hard mineral, the same things rubies and sapphires are made out of. So you should be fine cooking with it.

boiled water using his Jetboil but without the gas.
Can't say that I have, sorry. As long as you're fine with your pots getting covered in ash, I don't see why'd it be a problem though. If you're anticipating not having access to fuel, I'd suggest getting a woodburning backpacking stove instead. The Biolite is a good option, you probably don't give a shit about the charging port but the one thing it has that other woodburners don't have is a fan that blows oxygen into the fire–it's got a thermo-electric generator on it, so as the fire burns it powers the motor running the fan.

That looks pretty cool. Probably a royal pain to sleep in, though. I'd buy one to keep as a backup/emergency tool in a car or bugout bag.

But it's literally in most antiperspirants so we're already fucked user.
Nigger aluminum is one of the most common elements in the crust, you ingest a little of it every day. If you've ever had aspirin or a Tum you've had a lot more than a little, most of it passes right through you. Antiperspirants don't even include aluminum elementally, it's part of a complex ion compound. The only possible thing to fear from aluminum in antiperspirant is that the ionized aluminum can actually be pretty acidic if it's ever isolated. But from what I remember from chemistry the chances of the aluminum in that compound getting isolated without some kind of deliberate attempt are basically zero.

sawyer
Hmm, you mind asking me which Sawyer setup? I tried using their gravity filter as an alternative to platypus once. It filtered the water well enough, but really damn inconvenient to use compared to the Platypus for a variety of reasons.

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Ryder Morgan
Ryder Morgan

It seems like we've grossly neglected one major part of survival gear:
GUNS

What's the ideal innawoods rifle? I think the 10/22
with fagpul backpacker furniture is a pretty good option for a bugout/emergency rifle. It's nice and compact, not too heavy, you can store mags or gear inside the stock and grip, and it shoots the most common cartridge in the world.

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William Morris
William Morris

The blue one you can find at Walmart, for $20 something. I use it with the folding plastic bottle it came with or inline with a water bladder. Never used the gravity setup, if I'm staying somewhere that long I just boil water.

Joshua Davis
Joshua Davis

Oh yeah, that thing. Forgot about the inline feature, that's definitely a plus for quick solo filtering. Gravity filters are king if you're traveling with a group though, you can make a gallon of water in less than ten minutes. Boiling's fine if you're solo but once you have a few other people it can get tedious fast.

Christopher Jones
Christopher Jones

Looks like a bivvy bag but with a full-length zip and zip-in woobie blanket.
Not bad but seems a touch costly if you include shipping.

Nathaniel Smith
Nathaniel Smith

Well thanks for the level headed aluminum myth dispersion.
I like the sound of that. I think one of the ruger .22 target pistols might be another alternative
It's pricey for sure. It's mostly a curiosity to me. I just want to try it.

Kevin Moore
Kevin Moore

Wouldn't mind one myself- that camo seems pretty effective in imitating a rock.

Henry Evans
Henry Evans

Has anybody here used one of these car roof rack tents? Are they well-built? these things are expensive, the cheapest ones are around 300$. i've always felt like a good 4x4 with a rooftop tent or a flatbed 4x4 with a camper is the best way to be extremely mobile innawoods. Just bring some camo netting and park between some trees or bushes and you're good.
Only real problem is fuel, but extra tanks are easy to get.

I like to think that a .357 is the best woods gun. You can load .38 for small(ish) game, and .357 for deer, bears, niggers, or skinwalkers.
Of course, if you have a vehicle, size and weight matter a whole lot less.

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Andrew Morgan
Andrew Morgan

Sex sells, eat up goyim!

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Asher Fisher
Asher Fisher

saved my life
Story tiem?

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Logan Ramirez
Logan Ramirez

I decided I wanted to have a bit of an adventure, so I buy a kayak, pack it with camping shit, food, and an old 12ga and have a friend drop me off at the river. I was living in Montana at the time and I'd herd a ton of people say how nice it is just floating down the yellowstone river. I have a bit of kayak experience so it shouldn't be a big deal.

It was just after the snowmelt had finished and the river was really low, which I thought would have been a good thing, turns out it's not, low water exposed all the rocks and made some pretty big rapids. But I was having a blast, until about 15 miles down river right before I wanted to find a spot to camp, I went around some big rapids through a really shallow fast moving spot, too shallow for my kayak. I got cought up on a rock, the water current turned me sideways and tipped me over on the downstream side of the kayak, then the water pressure on the kayak preceded to grind me into the rocks, how I'm getting pushed I can't flip upright and to not die in a few inches of water I bail out of my kayak and hold onto it as it drags me along for the ride. When I round the bend in the river and see the big ass rapids I'm headed for I abandon the waterfilled kayak and swim to shore.

It's dusk, I'm exhausted, soaked, thirsty, it's getting cold, a bunch of clouds are rolling in, and I'm on the wrong side of the river. There was a road paralleling the river but it's a quarter mile on the other side and the river is about 100yards wide, of whitewater. The only useful things I had were a bright orange Mora knife clipped to my life jacket, a small fire steel necklace I almost always have on and as an after thought, a life straw I had bought the day before at Cabela's, because it was on sale. My cellphone, in a waterproof case had no signal.

After catching my breath the first thing I did was open up that life straw and drink what seemed like a gallon of water. Then after checking my phone useless. I decided tostart a fire, dryout and see what the weather was going to do. Well it took probably a little over an hour to start a fire despite being surrounded by tons of dead dry drift wood. Nerves or something, now I'm a fucking fire expert, i never want to go through that again. By now the weather has moved in and it starts fucking snowing, just flurries, but fuck. I had a long sleeve fishing shirt and some synthetic pants on, not great but I probably wouldn't freeze with a fire going. I kinda remembered a bridge a few miles back upriver, and was pretty sure that was the only one on this stretch of the river, but it could have been 2 miles or 7, so I decided to hunker down with my fire in a half dirt cave thing in the riverbank, really hoping it didn't flood. Instead of trying to walkout after dark. It was a long cold night but I survived with sun-up and with a half inch of snow on the ground I walked to the bridge, across it to the main road and hitched a ride home, guy even bought me a coffee.

Now i would have been fine drinking river water for one day and probably getting the shits, but I'm still the only person I know who's used one in a kinda real survival situation.

Pic is the river when I started, looks nice and calm.

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Jaxon Rivera
Jaxon Rivera

About a week later someone even found my kayak, well what was left of it. It was folded in half and had been torn open by a bear, but I got my old break action 12ga back.

Chase Fisher
Chase Fisher

Thanks for storytime

Matthew Walker
Matthew Walker

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Jaxson Edwards
Jaxson Edwards

Sheeit, that's intense. This is why you should always go innawoods with at least one other person–if shit happens one guy can bail the other out.

Owen Kelly
Owen Kelly

when you see the meme you created in the wild take on a life of its own
kek

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Logan Mitchell
Logan Mitchell

If weight/space is an issue, I raise you:
1. a pair of slip-joint pliers with a jaw like pic related (Channellocks also makes them at a more friendly price). Very versatile little tool.
2. a quality flat head screwdriver with a solid, beefy handle - good for prying, scraping, possibly hammering, and even driving screws.
3. a screwdriver with interchangeable bits and a little baggy with 3 or 4 common bits (Phillips, Torx, maybe square/Robertson)

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Joshua Collins
Joshua Collins

1. a pair of slip-joint pliers with a jaw like pic related
A pair of adjustable Vice Grips would work better imo, as you can lock them. Multitools aren't ideal for repair work but they're also a very nice option if space is at a premium, either a Leatherman of your choice or the Victorinox Swisschamp if you're providing your own pliers.

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Luis Butler
Luis Butler

The slip-joint pliers allow you to open the jaws super wide. A pair of Knipex Cobras that is only 7.25" long will get around a 1.5" pipe or a slightly under 1.5" bolt. Also, the jaw on them can grab bolts and nuts securely without marring them (much like an adjustable wrench.)

I'd probably bring both, but if I could only pack one it would be the slip-joints because I think they're more versatile.

Joseph Evans
Joseph Evans

We have given 8 marshal plans to africa because not doing so would have meant that money going to the people who produced the wealth in the first place, white americans and europeans.

Anthony Peterson
Anthony Peterson

given
stolen

staying on topic..
Chinese military shovel WJQ-308…grappling hook, plate, axe, pick, bottle opener, saw, melee weapon, wire gauge, wire cutter, ruler, can opener, claw hammer, shield…..

Adam Baker
Adam Baker

Cool. Currently looking into getting some gear like that.

Matthew Murphy
Matthew Murphy

folding shovels in general are great, i have an old dutch army shovel that does the job of a hatchet quite well, combined with a general purpose knife for batoning it makes for a great tool

Kevin Gomez
Kevin Gomez

Anybody here into lightweight/ultra-lightweight backpacking? My base weight is 9.65 lbs. Total 3-4 day loadout is 13.7 lbs, but that doesn't include my gun.

Samuel Martin
Samuel Martin

The reason I'm wondering, btw, is because the main principles behind lightweight backpacking are super useful in a bugout scenario, particularly a short-term one.

Last November, my girlfriend and I hiked a 30-mile trail here in PA, 10 miles per day (though we could have done 15 or more) with 2 very cold nights where we stayed perfectly warm and well-fed. This year we're looking at a couple 50-ish mile trails that we can do over 3-4 days. It's so empowering to be able to walk out into the woods and stay warm, dry, well-fed, and comfortable, with nothing more than you can carry fairly easily on your back.

Austin Johnson
Austin Johnson

No, but there is a reason /out/ had the slogan "you gonna carry that weight".
Being lighter is always better, so what did you pack on your trip?

Alexander Cox
Alexander Cox

How would a general purpose knife that is also adequate enough at stabbing people to be used as a bayonet look like?

Ryan Myers
Ryan Myers

Nice, what do you usually pack. My bug-out bag only probably has about half of the stuff I really need and is about 11 pounds, once I throw in my typical stuff I use for one day hunting trips I usually come out around 30 pounds. Though that is usually means a lot of stuff I wouldn't bring for actual bug-out time.

Evan Adams
Evan Adams

like this, but it is a bit big so i'm thinking about maybe swapping it out for this one
varusteleka.com/en/product/terava-jaakaripuukko-carbon-steel/56524

i also carry pic related 2 with me. but i prefer fixed blade knives

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Sebastian Watson
Sebastian Watson

Gear
My stuff only:
REI Half-Dome 2 (86.15 oz)
Big Agnes Insulated Air Core Ultra sleeping pad (21 oz)
Zefabak (cheap-ass) quilt (18.72 oz)
My shitty but lightweight Walmart backpack (11.8 oz)
Travel pillow from Walmart (6.95 oz)
2 quarts of water (17.89 oz with bottles)
Maglite Solitaire (1.05 oz)
cheap steel spoon (0.9 oz)
toothbrush (0.4 oz)

Gear we shared (split the weight between both of us as evenly as possible):
REI Half Dome 2 tent (86.15 oz)
bare-bones medkit with some antibiotic ointment, tiny sewing kit, SAM splint, and sports tape (6.85 oz)
Esbit stove with 6x14g tablets (6.3 oz)
water filter with 3 bags (don't have it here, don't remember the brand) (5.55 oz)
a power bank for our phones (5.45 oz)
a titanium cup for boiling water (4.15 oz)
Mora Craftline knife + sheath (3.85 oz)
an old gardening trowel (3.75 oz)
cheap tiny LED lantern (3.55 oz)
some paracord, a carabiner, and a lightweight bag for use as a bear bag (2.05 oz)
1/3 roll of toilet paper (2 oz)
little bottle of hand sanitizer (2oz)
little bottle of high-DEET bug spray (1.75 oz)
tiny tube of toothpaste (1 oz)

Food coming in a moment.

Ian Cook
Ian Cook

worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Identification_Guide/Finland/finland_2.html
Does the M1962 seem to be ideal?

Jordan Young
Jordan Young

should work just fine, i might be of more help if you told me what exactly you plan to use it for, just regular bushcrafting or as general purpose knife for a bugout bag?

Joshua Moore
Joshua Moore

Food (just mine… we eat totally different things, so none of this is shared)
4.081 lbs, 7270 calories (1781 cal/lb)

Not sure of a lot of these brands, but here we go:
bag of almonds and walnuts (5.45 oz, 850 cal)
JIF natural single-serving PB cups x6 (9.9 oz, 1500 cal)
trail mix "Essential Nutrients" from Walmart (5.7 oz, 850 cal)
Great Value Mountain Mix x3 (5.25 oz, 720 cal)
chicken flavor Ramen x2 (6.3 oz, 760 cal)
trail mix "Energy Mix" from Walmart (6.55 oz, 700 cal)
Clif Builder's Protein Mint flavor x2 (5.1 oz, 540 cal)
Minute Rice, 2 servings (3.3 oz, 340 cal)
Clif Builder's Protein Peanut Butter (2.75 oz, 280 cal)
Gatorade energy chews x3 (3.3 oz, 300 cal)
Spam slice, lol (2.6 oz, 210 cal)
Starkist buffalo chicken pouch (3.15 oz, 80 cal)
Starkist tuna in water pouch (2.95 oz, 70 cal)
Starkist chicken salad pouch (3 oz, 70 cal)

Not an ideal diet, and I could get it better and lighter, but I love to eat this bullshit so it kept me happy and kept me moving.

Jacob Sanchez
Jacob Sanchez

I'm mostly interested in a theoretical level, so could you give your opinion on both possibilities?

Liam Baker
Liam Baker

As far as firearms go, she carried my Ruger SP101 (I wanted to have something that would at least have a CHANCE against bears) loaded with Buffalo Bore 180-grain hardcast wadcutters + 1 speed strip of Winchester 125-grain hollowpoints and I carried my CZ Phantom with some hot Buffalo Bore 147-grain hollowpoints + 2 spare 18-round mags. I didn't factor these into the weight, because they aren't strictly necessary where we went, since black bears can easily be scared away and coyotes probably wouldn't attack us. However, were I preparing for a bugout situation instead of backpacking, I'd probably bring a lightweight .22 pistol of some sort and something like a Ruger LCR in .357 mag.

Jordan Hill
Jordan Hill

meant to put the REI tent only under shared stuff, not my stuff. We only brought 1 tent, lol

Caleb Williams
Caleb Williams

mandatory reading
woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2013/09/living-off-land-delusions-and.html

Cameron Peterson
Cameron Peterson

Nice I have used similar stuff in homemade "MREs" seems to work well enough and though I usually substitute ramen for instant potatoes.

Christopher Moore
Christopher Moore

when we're talking about regular bushcrafting, you are quite unlikely to end up in a fight, so really any knife that you can comfortably use will do, so long as you are willing to drag it along, it's why carry the victorinox with me, it rarely needs scharpening and doesn't to stand up to any real abuse, because even if it were to snap, i can walk down to the shop when i get home and get a new one.

when it comes to a bugout bag i want something that can take all the abuse i can throw at it and that can be easily sharpened and maintained. so i got the bk7, because it can take abuse, doubles as a hatchet for thin enough trees and works as a combat knife in a pinch, even though it's not meant to be one.

if you were to take a bayonet like the one you suggested. you will have something that can take abuse and stabs real well, but by the looks of the handle, it would probably be quite uncomfortable to use it for carving or anything that requires you to hold it tightly for exstended periods of time

Henry Stewart
Henry Stewart

I did a whole bunch of calculations on different foods regarding calories/lb, and anything with nuts pretty much tops the list. That bag of almonds and walnuts provides about 2495 calories per pound, the peanut butter is 2424 cal/lb, all the other trail mixes I have are over 2000 cal/lb.

If you watch videos of folks reviewing rations (Steve1989, for example) you'll notice that many of the modern "24-hour" rations have a ton of trail mix/nuts/granola/oats.

Ramen is about 1930 cal/lb, so it's decent density-wise. Before I did the lightweight thing and I was just going on regular camping trips, I would practically live off of fresh potatoes cooked in the fire. So naturally I considered instant mashed potatoes, but the problem I encountered was that it's a pain to clean: you'd have to use a heavy splash of water AND carry around some sort of scouring pad to wash out the cook pot (unless you get the type you can cook in the bag, which is an option I haven't thought of until now.)

Jonathan Evans
Jonathan Evans

regarding calories/lb

Lincoln Gray
Lincoln Gray

I don't speak/read Russian. What's he making, pemmican? (basically just well-cooked meat preserved in fat)

I considered trying it. I ended up deciding on stuff that I could just go grab at the store and could standardize (caloric content and weight doesn't vary.)

Oliver Murphy
Oliver Murphy

Ya usually since I only do one day trips I just leave the excess potato in the pot and clean when I get back home.

Also didn't realize there was bag cooked potatoes either, that sounds much better

Asher Scott
Asher Scott

What's he making, pemmican?
Uzbek variant of pemmican. Same idea. Only meat is not dried but fried. And then fully covered with melted fat for preservation. I think with commercial available meat today frying is much more safe and it tastes so much better (only don't overheat fat to burning and blackening it would become bitter).

Camden Bell
Camden Bell

I THINK they exist. They must, right? I haven't looked.

I built a dehydrator at home with the intent of making pemmican, but never used it for that. I like the idea of frying better… sounds delicious. Maybe I will give it a shot.

James Wood
James Wood

Actually, it seems you could just put some instant mashed potatoes into one of those heavy-duty freezer bags and it'll take boiling water no problem.

Owen Reed
Owen Reed

I wonder if that is healthy for you, usually getting plastics hot like that leeches some sort of garbage into the food.

Ryan Flores
Ryan Flores

Actually, I was just reading a bit about it and it turns out the polyethylene the bag is made of will start putting that garbage into your food at around 195 degrees F. Am I willing to risk it? Probably. Also, mostly anything that requires boiling water WILL cook/rehydrate at 195 or less, just a little more slowly. Maybe that's the way to go.

Jeremiah Russell
Jeremiah Russell

I mean I would risk it in true SHTF scenario, if it's die this week or have gut cancer 30 years from now the answer is clear. Or I guess just go with ramen.

Evan Rogers
Evan Rogers

Agreed. I also forgot to mention that for the Minute rice that I bring, I bring it in a small aluminum foil pan (weighs 0.4 oz) from a restaurant supply store. Granted, the rice doesn't stick like mashed potatoes do, but I would consider something like that if you were hell-bent on the potatoes. That way you don't dirty your cooking vessel, and the foil pan can be folded up to take up less space. Then you just toss it or wash it when you get home (you could wash it and bend it back into shape, but these things cost me $0.25 each so I'm not concerned.)

Jose Edwards
Jose Edwards

Interesting didn't think of that, I have an austrian and yugoslav mess kits that I use for my camping. They work well enough, but that sounds like a really lightweight supplement.

Xavier Ross
Xavier Ross

The entirety of our cooking system is a TOAKS 750ml titanium pot (which the internet says weighs 3.6 oz, but that must be without the handle or bag because I weigh it at 4.15 oz) plus one of these little aluminum things (pic related, can be found on eBay) for each of us (.4 oz each), plus a spoon for each of us (0.9 oz each). The containers are nice because we can fit other stuff inside them for packing purposes. We're happy with it. Occasionally we'll bring a styrofoam, plastic, or cardboard cup and single-serving instant coffee as well, but we usually just forego caffeine entirely (though I'm considering bringing a Mio or some flavored electrolyte drink tablets for next time.)

It's nice to have multiple cooking/drinking/serving vessels, but you just can't do that if you want a total pack weight of under 15 lbs so you can hike 10+ miles per day.

I guess in a SHTF situation having multiple cooking vessels would make more sense, particularly if you're relying on hunting/trapping for food and there's a lot more preparation needing to be done.

Upcoming post is filled with things that I've learned since I've started backpacking.

Sebastian Diaz
Sebastian Diaz

Forgot to attach pic. Woops.

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Levi Rivera
Levi Rivera

Do you usually drink caffeine? I found that if you have a low tolerance caffeine can really help out when things are rough.

Luke Murphy
Luke Murphy

The first time I attempted backpacking, I brought a 55L internal frame pack that itself weight about 6 lbs. I then proceeded to pack another 30.6 lbs into it and attempt to carry it around for a couple days. It did not go well. Though the frame pack kept the weight well-distributed, it was like a gained 36.6 lbs. My pace was about 2 mph, and each mile got harder and harder. Plus, the process of loading and unloading all that gear before I got to even set up the tent and start my meal was just tedious and ruined my moral. In other words: you'll be much happier if you just pack light, even if it means missing out on some comfort items.

One of the biggest improvements I've made was switching from big, heavy, waterproof hiking boots to barefoot-style sneakers. It requires 4-6x more energy to move weight on your feet as opposed to on your back. With this in mind, rather than wearing my 4 lb boots, I opted to wear the same thing I always wear: 1.5 lb Puma motorsport shoes (sized up to accommodate some thick wool socks). My feet were getting wet in the "waterproof" boots anyway, so I just figured I'd roll with it. The Pumas dry out faster, and the wool socks keep my feet warm even when wet. Many people use trail running shoes for this purpose, but I just used what I had.
Switching to this style of shoe will hurt your feet in the beginning, so you have to work up to it slowly. It will, however, reduce your chance of injury to your knees and upper legs, and you'll walk in a more natural way… plus you'll pay more attention to your footing, which is always helpful.

Several of my biggest weight savings:
- rather than bringing a ton of water (weighs about 8 lbs per gallon), bring a small amount of water (like 16 oz) plus an empty bigger water bottle (32 oz) and a water filter. Fill up the 16 oz bottle every chance you get, but only fill up the 32 oz bottle when you're near the spot you'll be spending the night. Exact amounts will vary based on your needs and the climate.
- sleeping bags waste weight. The fluffy insulation that you lay on top of gets crushed and doesn't insulate you as well, so you may as well cut it in half and use it as a blanket. This is what they sell camping quilts for: it's basically half a sleeping bag, but it doesn't need a zipper and it can pack way more insulation in and still way less. For insulation from the ground, closed-cell foam is pretty much the best insulation you can get for its weight and price, although it's not super comfortable. Insulated air pads are much more comfortable and can tolerate very low temperatures. I went from a 4 lb sleeping bag to a 2.5 lb quilt+air pad that keeps me warmer, and I haven't looked back.
- cut the handle off your toothbrush, bring 2 tent stakes instead of 4, find the tiniest bottles of toothpaste/bug spray/sunblock/soap/hand sanitizer you can find, put in fresh batteries before you go out rather than bringing a spare, have your phone totally charged and battery-saving options enabled so you can bring a smaller power bank or forego it altogether. Weight everything, and be stingy.

Brody Torres
Brody Torres

I only really have a cup or two a day on average. Not enough that 3 days without it causes me to have withdrawals or anything.

We used to keep caffeine pills in our medical kit, but we found that we didn't need them. Now I bring energy gels that can help give me a quick boost to get me through the last leg of a hike, and I find they work just as well. Occasionally we'll bring tea or instant coffee packets, but again, we're finding more and more that we don't really need them.

Jayden Martinez
Jayden Martinez

cup or two a day on average
no withdraws

Lucky you. I have a low caffeine tolerance so a little amps me up a ton but if I use it daily I will have about a two day hangover if I stop. Because of that I stopped drinking coffee and keep specifically for when days I really need it.

Insulated air pads is not a bad idea. I have had a lot of disappointing experiences with sleeping bags, I will try that out.

Kayden Morales
Kayden Morales

It's a more expensive sleep system than your run-of-the-mill sleeping bag cold-ish-weather sleeping bag, but then again it weighs less, packs smaller, and is more comfortable (unless you use a sleeping pad in conjunction with the sleeping bag, which just adds more weight and cost.)

That's a shame about the caffeine for you. I guess I'm just no really sensitive to it. I say a cup or two a day on average because some days I'll have none at all, some days I'll have 3-4, it really depends on how my workday goes (I have a very physical job.) Maybe that helps keep me from withdrawing - the fact that I don't have it EVERY day.

Isaiah Cox
Isaiah Cox

run-of-the-mill sleeping bag cold-ish-weather sleeping bag
Jesus, my grammar and spelling is all fucking off today. I'm not dumb, I swear.

Justin Rivera
Justin Rivera

The biggest recommendation I have, and here's looking at you guys who think you have your perfect bugout bag set up: go out and test it. I basically went to a campground where I could park my car at the site, and I took every single piece of gear I could. I spent a weekend there. I left all the gear in the car and only took stuff out as I needed it. I took note of what I actually used, then put it in a pack the next day and went for a hike. If it was too heavy, I repeated the process. After 3-4 camping trips, I found a system that allowed me to actually live comfortably out in the woods AND be lightweight enough to be highly-mobile. Then I started ACTUALLY doing it, hiking 10+ miles per day and camping in the actual wilderness each night, and I found even more ways to optimize my load.

Tyler Harris
Tyler Harris

We have literally the same knoife in the army. It's a gift from the heavens. Buy one, keep it forever.

Michael Perez
Michael Perez

BOARD OWNER
I DEMAND THAT YOU RANGE BAN ALL MUTT IPS. AMERIMUTTS DO NOT DESERVE TO POST ON THIS BOARD LET ALONE ACTUALLY OWN GUNS WHICH RIGHTFULLY BELONG TO EUROPEANS.
I ALSO DEMAND LESS TALK ABOUT WEAPONS AND MORE TALK ABOUT HATRED OF THE MUTTS AS WELL AS TORTURE PORN MADE OF KILLING BURGERMUTT BABIES AND FORCEFEEDING THEM TO THEIR PARENTS BEFORE CHOPPING THEM UP.
DIE MUTTS DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE
/b/4lyfe

Brayden Wright
Brayden Wright

Is /b/ trying to relive the old raid days?

Joshua Gonzalez
Joshua Gonzalez

BOARD OWNER
I DEMAND THAT YOU RANGE BAN ALL MUTT IPS. AMERIMUTTS DO NOT DESERVE TO POST ON THIS BOARD LET ALONE ACTUALLY OWN GUNS WHICH RIGHTFULLY BELONG TO EUROPEANS.
I ALSO DEMAND LESS TALK ABOUT WEAPONS AND MORE TALK ABOUT HATRED OF THE MUTTS AS WELL AS TORTURE PORN MADE OF KILLING BURGERMUTT BABIES AND FORCEFEEDING THEM TO THEIR PARENTS BEFORE CHOPPING THEM UP.
DIE MUTTS DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE

Jason Myers
Jason Myers

BOARD OWNER
I DEMAND THAT YOU RANGE BAN ALL MUTT IPS. AMERIMUTTS DO NOT DESERVE TO POST ON THIS BOARD LET ALONE ACTUALLY OWN GUNS WHICH RIGHTFULLY BELONG TO EUROPEANS.
I ALSO DEMAND LESS TALK ABOUT WEAPONS AND MORE TALK ABOUT HATRED OF THE MUTTS AS WELL AS TORTURE PORN MADE OF KILLING BURGERMUTT BABIES AND FORCEFEEDING THEM TO THEIR PARENTS BEFORE CHOPPING THEM UP.
DIE MUTTS DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE

Anthony Thompson
Anthony Thompson

BOARD OWNER
I DEMAND THAT YOU RANGE BAN ALL MUTT IPS. AMERIMUTTS DO NOT DESERVE TO POST ON THIS BOARD LET ALONE ACTUALLY OWN GUNS WHICH RIGHTFULLY BELONG TO EUROPEANS.
I ALSO DEMAND LESS TALK ABOUT WEAPONS AND MORE TALK ABOUT HATRED OF THE MUTTS AS WELL AS TORTURE PORN MADE OF KILLING BURGERMUTT BABIES AND FORCEFEEDING THEM TO THEIR PARENTS BEFORE CHOPPING THEM UP.
DIE MUTTS DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE

Oliver Russell
Oliver Russell

BOARD OWNER
I DEMAND THAT YOU RANGE BAN ALL MUTT IPS. AMERIMUTTS DO NOT DESERVE TO POST ON THIS BOARD LET ALONE ACTUALLY OWN GUNS WHICH RIGHTFULLY BELONG TO EUROPEANS.
I ALSO DEMAND LESS TALK ABOUT WEAPONS AND MORE TALK ABOUT HATRED OF THE MUTTS AS WELL AS TORTURE PORN MADE OF KILLING BURGERMUTT BABIES AND FORCEFEEDING THEM TO THEIR PARENTS BEFORE CHOPPING THEM UP.
DIE MUTTS DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE

Nathaniel Price
Nathaniel Price

BOARD OWNER
I DEMAND THAT YOU RANGE BAN ALL MUTT IPS. AMERIMUTTS DO NOT DESERVE TO POST ON THIS BOARD LET ALONE ACTUALLY OWN GUNS WHICH RIGHTFULLY BELONG TO EUROPEANS.
I ALSO DEMAND LESS TALK ABOUT WEAPONS AND MORE TALK ABOUT HATRED OF THE MUTTS AS WELL AS TORTURE PORN MADE OF KILLING BURGERMUTT BABIES AND FORCEFEEDING THEM TO THEIR PARENTS BEFORE CHOPPING THEM UP.
DIE MUTTS DIE DIE DIE DIE DIE

Gavin Gonzalez
Gavin Gonzalez

A lot of pickups have space under the bed enough for a second fuel tank.

I've also thought about the truckbed camper set up. I feel like a regular bed cover (roof height) would be better for shtf as its a lot lighter and still keeps you out of the wind and rain. Granted it doesn't have the luxuries of a kitchenette and a toilet.

Jackson Edwards
Jackson Edwards

Does the charcoal need to be crushed?

Nathaniel Lopez
Nathaniel Lopez

Charcoal is naturally porous, is it not? I don't think crushing it would be necessary.

Chase Roberts
Chase Roberts

Yes, it would have big gaps between pieces otherwise. Crushing also greatly increases surface area and allows for better filters.

Guys, what type of ammo do you stock up, FMJ?

Brandon Phillips
Brandon Phillips

I want to buy a good canteen (living in europe).
What do you advice?
Moreover, what do you think about filtration system? I feel that it's totaly useless, since you just need a good canteen and fire to purify water. Moreover, I'm searching for sustainable solution, not the whole "bob" shit that is only useful for 72h.
So I need a good canteen/mess kit. And I've no idea what to buy. Truly need something that'll last, that I can throw around, put it in the fire, and still be confident it'll stand for the next 20 years.
I was looking at pathfinder stuff, but it seems to be shit. A lot of website sells old junk, but I don't think that's what is still in use in the army. And what is in the army is mostly shit, compared to what purpose the market (at least here a lot of militaries are buying from shops and replacing issued gears).
Obviously for prep purpose.

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Charles Nguyen
Charles Nguyen

Maybe something like that:
rei.com/product/870075/snow-peak-personal-cooker-3-cookset
(or in titanium: rei.com/product/668927/snow-peak-titanium-multi-compact-cookset)
This look fucking good: rei.com/product/830774/gsi-outdoors-pinnacle-dualist-cookset
But god, Teflon-coated aluminum? For fucking real? Every one is banning teflon here for how carcinogenous it is.

Maybe am I taking the wrong approach, and should I look for a more "family" usage, rather that for just my own personal use.
Or maybe buy the two.

Camden Ramirez
Camden Ramirez

All right, I already have a camel back if I need to carry more water, but I'll buy the stainless steel nalgene + takonta cup that fit, for around 50 euros.
Don't think that's the best, but whatever.

Christopher Russell
Christopher Russell

100$
user, just buy some surplus varusteleka.com/en/group/canteens/879

Levi Foster
Levi Foster

Should put out a babes of Zig Forums calendar, whether they be traps or just dudes with feminine looking peni.

Joshua Adams
Joshua Adams

Pretty face, appropriate body fat distribution, natural tits, overall package only detracted by her umbilical hernia. would still fuck and brag about it afterwards regardless protip for streloks: run of the mill umbilical hernias are a trivial outpatient surgical repair

Levi Ward
Levi Ward

gay shit
even ironically

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Kevin Howard
Kevin Howard

gay shit found on Zig Forums must have been posted ironically
<found the newfag
Seriously, this place is overrun by faggots. Yes, traps and trapfuckers are faggots too.

Jack Smith
Jack Smith

burn in hell fag enabler

Jackson Wilson
Jackson Wilson

Zig Forums is gay bros

Luke Gray
Luke Gray

There is a really good reason why tripfags get the gas unironically.

Attached: k---happy-fun-realization-time.png (1.31 MB, 1960x1644)

Anthony James
Anthony James

fag enabler
Far from it. I wasn't the one requesting the degenerate trap shit. Any workable recommendations to defaggot the board? The furries need to go too.

Nolan Anderson
Nolan Anderson

There is a really good reason why tripfags get the gas unironically.
Tripcodes and names were disabled years ago after some porn posting faggot autistically shrieked and shitflooded the board after a user script was posted that could completely obliterate all of his posts and threads from view.

But yeah, gas them too.

Dylan Barnes
Dylan Barnes

Far as I'm concerned faggots are tripfags. Don't matter if there is actual tripfagging involved. Besides that I remember when that faggot got wordfiltered by the BO, god damn was that a hilarious day of spam.

Parker Wilson
Parker Wilson

THANK YOU FINALLY TRUTH IN SIMPLE TO UNDERSTAND NO FRILLS TRUTH,ARROGANCE VERSES COMMON SENSE ,COMMON WINS EVERTIME,I TRULY APPRECIATE SIMPLE RAW TRUTH PRIDE COMETH BFORE THE FALL. IM 100% AMERICAN RIDGE RUNNER EAST TN BOY

Jason Myers
Jason Myers

kek i remember this thread

Carson Nguyen
Carson Nguyen

hdtdtgh

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